Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

A comparative study of song form and duetting in neotropical Thryothorus wrens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Author(s)

Nigel I. Mann, Kimberly A. Dingess, F. Keith Barker, Jefferson Alden Graves, Peter J. B. Slater

School/Research organisations

Abstract

The traditionally-defined wren genus Thryothorus is notable for its diversity of singing styles with some species producing highly coordinated duets or choruses in various formats while, at the other extreme, songs are performed almost exclusively by males. In this comparative study, we document the singing styles of almost all of the 27 or so species in this group, relating these to a molecular phylogeny in an effort to identify the conditions that have led to the evolution of duetting and chorus singing. In a previous study, we used molecular data to demonstrate that Thryothorus is actually paraphyletic, leading us to propose its splitting into three genera ( one newly described) in addition to Thryothorus. Here we show that most species within each of these four genera usually sing with the same style, and that these styles tend to differ between the genera. We also show that a few species have songs that differ markedly from those most typical of their genus. We argue that these exceptional cases will provide important insights into the origins of duetting behavior, and tentatively suggest factors that may have played a role in determining the extent to which male and female birds combine their vocalizations together.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-43
Number of pages43
JournalBehaviour
Volume146
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Higher songs of city birds may not be an individual response to noise

    Zollinger, S. A., Slater, P. J. B., Nemeth, E. & Brumm, H., 16 Aug 2017, In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 284, 1860, 8 p., 20170602.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Learning and cultural transmission in chaffinch song

    Riebel, K., Lachlan, R. F. & Slater, P. J. B., May 2015, Advances in the Study of Behavior. Naguib, M., Brockmann, H. J., Mitani, J. C., Simmons, L. W., Barrett, L., Healy, S. & Slater, P. J. B. (eds.). Elsevier, Vol. 47. p. 181-227 (Advances in the Study of Behavior; vol. 47).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  3. Female happy wrens select songs to cooperate with their mates rather than confront intruders

    Templeton, C. N., Ríos-Chelén, A. A., Quirós-Guerrero, E., Mann, N. I. & Slater, P. J. B., 23 Feb 2013, In: Biology Letters. 9, 1, 20120863.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. An experimental study of duet integration in the happy wren, Pheugopedius felix

    Templeton, C. N., Mann, N. I., Rios-Chelend, A., Quiros-Guerrero, E. & Slater, P. J. B., 2013, In: Animal Behaviour. 86, p. 821-827

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Song duets function primarily as cooperative displays in pairs of happy wrens

    Templeton, C. N., Rivera-Caceres, K. D., Mann, N. I. & Slater, P. J. B., Dec 2011, In: Animal Behaviour. 82, 6, p. 1399-1407 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Do orientation and substrate influence apparent turning biases by the 7-spot ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata?

    Humphreys, R. K. & Ruxton, G. D., 20 Mar 2020, In: Behaviour. 157, 3-4, p. 205-230 26 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Cultural evolution of killer whale calls: background, mechanisms and consequences

    Filatova, O. A., Samarra, F. I. P., Deecke, V. B., Ford, J. K. B., Miller, P. J. O. & Yurk, H., 2015, In: Behaviour. 152, 15, p. 2001-2038 38 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

  3. Early-life nutritional stress affects associative learning and spatial memory but not performance on a novel object test

    Kriengwatana, B., Farrell, T. M., Aitken, S. D. T., Garcia, L. & MacDougall-Shackleton, S. A., 2015, In: Behaviour. 152, 2, p. 195-218 24 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Association tendency and preference for heterospecifics in an invasive species

    Camacho-Cervantes, M., Ojanguren, A. F., Deacon, A. E., Ramnarine, I. W. & Magurran, A. E., 2014, In: Behaviour. 151, 6, p. 769-780 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 415840

Top