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A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound. / Johnson, Mark; Tyack, P L .

In: IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 3-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Johnson, M & Tyack, PL 2003, 'A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound' IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 3-12. https://doi.org/10.1109/JOE.2002.808212

APA

Johnson, M., & Tyack, P. L. (2003). A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound. IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, 28(1), 3-12. https://doi.org/10.1109/JOE.2002.808212

Vancouver

Johnson M, Tyack PL. A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound. IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering. 2003 Jan;28(1):3-12. https://doi.org/10.1109/JOE.2002.808212

Author

Johnson, Mark ; Tyack, P L . / A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound. In: IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering. 2003 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 3-12.

Bibtex - Download

@article{934e8d14a3944ecebb3f749c0b64de8c,
title = "A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound",
abstract = "Definitive studies on the response of marine mammals to anthropogenic sound are hampered by the short surface time and deep-diving lifestyle of many species. A novel archival tag, called the DTAG, has been developed to monitor the behavior of marine mammals, and their response to sound, continuously throughout the dive cycle. The tag contains a large array of solid-state memory and records continuously from a built-in hydrophone and suite of sensors. The sensors sample the orientation of the animal in three dimensions with sufficient speed and resolution to capture individual fluke strokes. Audio and sensor recording is synchronous so the relative timing of sounds and motion can be determined precisely. The DTAG has been attached to more than 30 northern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) and 20 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) with recording duration of up to 12 h per deployment. Several deployments have included sound playbacks to the tagged whale and a transient response to at least one playback is evident in the tag data.",
keywords = "Effects of noise, Marine animals, Tags, Underwater acoustic measurements, Northern elephant seals, Whales",
author = "Mark Johnson and Tyack, {P L}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1109/JOE.2002.808212",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "3--12",
journal = "IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering",
issn = "0364-9059",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A digital acoustic recording tag for measuring the response of wild marine mammals to sound

AU - Johnson, Mark

AU - Tyack, P L

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - Definitive studies on the response of marine mammals to anthropogenic sound are hampered by the short surface time and deep-diving lifestyle of many species. A novel archival tag, called the DTAG, has been developed to monitor the behavior of marine mammals, and their response to sound, continuously throughout the dive cycle. The tag contains a large array of solid-state memory and records continuously from a built-in hydrophone and suite of sensors. The sensors sample the orientation of the animal in three dimensions with sufficient speed and resolution to capture individual fluke strokes. Audio and sensor recording is synchronous so the relative timing of sounds and motion can be determined precisely. The DTAG has been attached to more than 30 northern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) and 20 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) with recording duration of up to 12 h per deployment. Several deployments have included sound playbacks to the tagged whale and a transient response to at least one playback is evident in the tag data.

AB - Definitive studies on the response of marine mammals to anthropogenic sound are hampered by the short surface time and deep-diving lifestyle of many species. A novel archival tag, called the DTAG, has been developed to monitor the behavior of marine mammals, and their response to sound, continuously throughout the dive cycle. The tag contains a large array of solid-state memory and records continuously from a built-in hydrophone and suite of sensors. The sensors sample the orientation of the animal in three dimensions with sufficient speed and resolution to capture individual fluke strokes. Audio and sensor recording is synchronous so the relative timing of sounds and motion can be determined precisely. The DTAG has been attached to more than 30 northern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) and 20 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) with recording duration of up to 12 h per deployment. Several deployments have included sound playbacks to the tagged whale and a transient response to at least one playback is evident in the tag data.

KW - Effects of noise

KW - Marine animals

KW - Tags

KW - Underwater acoustic measurements

KW - Northern elephant seals

KW - Whales

U2 - 10.1109/JOE.2002.808212

DO - 10.1109/JOE.2002.808212

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 3

EP - 12

JO - IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering

T2 - IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering

JF - IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering

SN - 0364-9059

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 17104908