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A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol

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A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors : a mixed-methods study protocol. / Cruickshank, Susanne; Steel, Emma; Fenlon, Deborah; Armes, Jo; Scanlon, Karen; Banks, Elspeth; Humphris, Gerald.

In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, Vol. 4, No. 1, 22, 20.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cruickshank, S, Steel, E, Fenlon, D, Armes, J, Scanlon, K, Banks, E & Humphris, G 2017, 'A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol' Pilot and Feasibility Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, 22. DOI: 10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8

APA

Cruickshank, S., Steel, E., Fenlon, D., Armes, J., Scanlon, K., Banks, E., & Humphris, G. (2017). A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 4(1), [22]. DOI: 10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8

Vancouver

Cruickshank S, Steel E, Fenlon D, Armes J, Scanlon K, Banks E et al. A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol. Pilot and Feasibility Studies. 2017 Jul 20;4(1). 22. Available from, DOI: 10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8

Author

Cruickshank, Susanne ; Steel, Emma ; Fenlon, Deborah ; Armes, Jo ; Scanlon, Karen ; Banks, Elspeth ; Humphris, Gerald. / A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors : a mixed-methods study protocol. In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies. 2017 ; Vol. 4, No. 1.

Bibtex - Download

@article{013c6c6d1af044adb3caa677622cb428,
title = "A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol",
abstract = "Background:  Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a major concern for patients following treatment for primary breast cancer, affecting 60–99{\%} of breast cancer survivors. Mini-AFTER is a brief intervention developed to address this fear, that breast care nurses are ideally placed to deliver. However, their interest in delivering such an intervention is unknown and crucial to its introduction. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for implementation by breast care nurses to manage moderate levels of fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.Methods:  A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design will be used, informed by normalisation process theory (NPT). The design will be guided by the stages of NPT. Specifically, understanding and evaluating the process (implementation) that would enable an intervention, such as the Mini-AFTER, not only to be operationalised and normalised into everyday work (embedded) but also sustained in practice (integration). Phase 1: all members on the UK Breast Cancer Care Nursing Network database (n = 905) will be emailed a link to a web-based survey, designed to investigate how breast cancer survivors’ FoR is identified and managed within current services and their willingness to deliver the Mini-AFTER. Phase 2: a purposive sample of respondents (n = 20) will be interviewed to build upon the responses in phase 1 and explore breast care nurses’ individual views on the importance of addressing fear of recurrence in their clinical consultations, interest in the Mini-AFTER intervention, the content, skills required and challenges to deliver the intervention.Discussion:  This study will provide information about the willingness of breast care nurses (BCNs) to provide a structured intervention to manage fear of recurrence. It will identify barriers and facilitators for effective delivery and inform the future design of a larger trial of the Mini-AFTER intervention.",
keywords = "Fear of cancer recurrence, Breast cancer, Breast care nurses, Mixed methods, Intervention",
author = "Susanne Cruickshank and Emma Steel and Deborah Fenlon and Jo Armes and Karen Scanlon and Elspeth Banks and Gerald Humphris",
note = "This study has been funded by the breast cancer research charity Breast Cancer Now (Ref: 2015NovSP679).",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
journal = "Pilot and Feasibility Studies",
issn = "2055-5784",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors

T2 - Pilot and Feasibility Studies

AU - Cruickshank,Susanne

AU - Steel,Emma

AU - Fenlon,Deborah

AU - Armes,Jo

AU - Scanlon,Karen

AU - Banks,Elspeth

AU - Humphris,Gerald

N1 - This study has been funded by the breast cancer research charity Breast Cancer Now (Ref: 2015NovSP679).

PY - 2017/7/20

Y1 - 2017/7/20

N2 - Background:  Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a major concern for patients following treatment for primary breast cancer, affecting 60–99% of breast cancer survivors. Mini-AFTER is a brief intervention developed to address this fear, that breast care nurses are ideally placed to deliver. However, their interest in delivering such an intervention is unknown and crucial to its introduction. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for implementation by breast care nurses to manage moderate levels of fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.Methods:  A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design will be used, informed by normalisation process theory (NPT). The design will be guided by the stages of NPT. Specifically, understanding and evaluating the process (implementation) that would enable an intervention, such as the Mini-AFTER, not only to be operationalised and normalised into everyday work (embedded) but also sustained in practice (integration). Phase 1: all members on the UK Breast Cancer Care Nursing Network database (n = 905) will be emailed a link to a web-based survey, designed to investigate how breast cancer survivors’ FoR is identified and managed within current services and their willingness to deliver the Mini-AFTER. Phase 2: a purposive sample of respondents (n = 20) will be interviewed to build upon the responses in phase 1 and explore breast care nurses’ individual views on the importance of addressing fear of recurrence in their clinical consultations, interest in the Mini-AFTER intervention, the content, skills required and challenges to deliver the intervention.Discussion:  This study will provide information about the willingness of breast care nurses (BCNs) to provide a structured intervention to manage fear of recurrence. It will identify barriers and facilitators for effective delivery and inform the future design of a larger trial of the Mini-AFTER intervention.

AB - Background:  Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a major concern for patients following treatment for primary breast cancer, affecting 60–99% of breast cancer survivors. Mini-AFTER is a brief intervention developed to address this fear, that breast care nurses are ideally placed to deliver. However, their interest in delivering such an intervention is unknown and crucial to its introduction. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for implementation by breast care nurses to manage moderate levels of fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.Methods:  A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design will be used, informed by normalisation process theory (NPT). The design will be guided by the stages of NPT. Specifically, understanding and evaluating the process (implementation) that would enable an intervention, such as the Mini-AFTER, not only to be operationalised and normalised into everyday work (embedded) but also sustained in practice (integration). Phase 1: all members on the UK Breast Cancer Care Nursing Network database (n = 905) will be emailed a link to a web-based survey, designed to investigate how breast cancer survivors’ FoR is identified and managed within current services and their willingness to deliver the Mini-AFTER. Phase 2: a purposive sample of respondents (n = 20) will be interviewed to build upon the responses in phase 1 and explore breast care nurses’ individual views on the importance of addressing fear of recurrence in their clinical consultations, interest in the Mini-AFTER intervention, the content, skills required and challenges to deliver the intervention.Discussion:  This study will provide information about the willingness of breast care nurses (BCNs) to provide a structured intervention to manage fear of recurrence. It will identify barriers and facilitators for effective delivery and inform the future design of a larger trial of the Mini-AFTER intervention.

KW - Fear of cancer recurrence

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Breast care nurses

KW - Mixed methods

KW - Intervention

U2 - 10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8

DO - 10.1186/s40814-017-0161-8

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Pilot and Feasibility Studies

JF - Pilot and Feasibility Studies

SN - 2055-5784

IS - 1

M1 - 22

ER -

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