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A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention

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A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention. / Whitehead, Ross David; Ozakinci, Gozde; Perrett, David Ian.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2014, p. 99-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Whitehead, RD, Ozakinci, G & Perrett, DI 2014, 'A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention', Health Psychology, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 99-102. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032322

APA

Whitehead, R. D., Ozakinci, G., & Perrett, D. I. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention. Health Psychology, 33(1), 99-102. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032322

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Whitehead RD, Ozakinci G, Perrett DI. A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention. Health Psychology. 2014;33(1):99-102. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032322

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Whitehead, Ross David ; Ozakinci, Gozde ; Perrett, David Ian. / A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention. In: Health Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 99-102.

Bibtex - Download

@article{97c1abddde7941bf94f4e682aa90cfc3,
title = "A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention",
abstract = "Objective: Inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption precipitates preventable morbidity and mortality. The efficacy of an appearance-based dietary intervention was investigated, which illustrates the beneficial effect that fruit and vegetable consumption has on skin appearance. Methods: Participants were randomly allocated to three groups receiving information-only or a generic or own-face appearance-based intervention. Diet was recorded at baseline and 10 weekly follow-ups. Participants in the generic and own-face intervention groups witnessed on-screen stimuli and received printed photographic materials to illustrate the beneficial effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Results: Controlling for baseline diet, a significant effect of intervention group was found on self-reported fruit and vegetable intake among 46 completers who were free of medical and personal reasons preventing diet change. The own-face appearance-based intervention group reported a significant, sustained improvement in fruit and vegetable consumption whereas the information-only and generic appearance-based intervention groups reported no significant dietary changes. Conclusions: Seeing the potential benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on own skin color may motivate dietary improvement.",
keywords = "Fruit and vegetables, Diet, Appearance-based intervention, Skin colour, Cartenoids",
author = "Whitehead, {Ross David} and Gozde Ozakinci and Perrett, {David Ian}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1037/a0032322",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "99--102",
journal = "Health Psychology",
issn = "0278-6133",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-based dietary intervention

AU - Whitehead, Ross David

AU - Ozakinci, Gozde

AU - Perrett, David Ian

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective: Inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption precipitates preventable morbidity and mortality. The efficacy of an appearance-based dietary intervention was investigated, which illustrates the beneficial effect that fruit and vegetable consumption has on skin appearance. Methods: Participants were randomly allocated to three groups receiving information-only or a generic or own-face appearance-based intervention. Diet was recorded at baseline and 10 weekly follow-ups. Participants in the generic and own-face intervention groups witnessed on-screen stimuli and received printed photographic materials to illustrate the beneficial effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Results: Controlling for baseline diet, a significant effect of intervention group was found on self-reported fruit and vegetable intake among 46 completers who were free of medical and personal reasons preventing diet change. The own-face appearance-based intervention group reported a significant, sustained improvement in fruit and vegetable consumption whereas the information-only and generic appearance-based intervention groups reported no significant dietary changes. Conclusions: Seeing the potential benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on own skin color may motivate dietary improvement.

AB - Objective: Inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption precipitates preventable morbidity and mortality. The efficacy of an appearance-based dietary intervention was investigated, which illustrates the beneficial effect that fruit and vegetable consumption has on skin appearance. Methods: Participants were randomly allocated to three groups receiving information-only or a generic or own-face appearance-based intervention. Diet was recorded at baseline and 10 weekly follow-ups. Participants in the generic and own-face intervention groups witnessed on-screen stimuli and received printed photographic materials to illustrate the beneficial effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Results: Controlling for baseline diet, a significant effect of intervention group was found on self-reported fruit and vegetable intake among 46 completers who were free of medical and personal reasons preventing diet change. The own-face appearance-based intervention group reported a significant, sustained improvement in fruit and vegetable consumption whereas the information-only and generic appearance-based intervention groups reported no significant dietary changes. Conclusions: Seeing the potential benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on own skin color may motivate dietary improvement.

KW - Fruit and vegetables

KW - Diet

KW - Appearance-based intervention

KW - Skin colour

KW - Cartenoids

U2 - 10.1037/a0032322

DO - 10.1037/a0032322

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 99

EP - 102

JO - Health Psychology

JF - Health Psychology

SN - 0278-6133

IS - 1

ER -

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