Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

A systematic review of methods for studying the impacts of outdoor recreation on terrestrial wildlife

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Outdoor recreation is a known source of disturbance to many wildlife populations. We systematically reviewed 126 relevant papers that study the impact of outdoor recreation on wildlife, focusing on terrestrial wildlife (birds excluded) to assess the different methodological approaches adopted by researchers. We characterised the research methods into seven categories (direct observation, indirect observation (field-based), telemetry, camera traps, physiological measurement, trapping, and simulation). We find that direct observation is the most commonly used method to capture human-wildlife interactions, followed by the use of telemetry, and camera traps. The animals most commonly studied were ungulates, and the orders Carnivora and Rodentia. Studies typically captured data over longer periods (median 54 months) when using trapping methods; other methods exhibited shorter study durations (median 22 months). The size of the animal under study appears to influence how methods are chosen, with larger species often being studied using telemetry methods. We highlight advantages and disadvantages of each method depending on the aims of the study, the focal species, and the type of outdoor recreation. Our review highlights the need for simultaneous measurements of both human activity and wildlife response. We also recommend that researchers consider how to capture both short- and long-term impacts on animal welfare. Our findings should guide applied wildlife conservation and management research in scenarios where human-wildlife interactions lead to conservation issues.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere00917
JournalGlobal Ecology and Conservation
Volume22
Early online date14 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

    Research areas

  • Human-wildlife conflict, Outdoor recreation, Method, Data collection, Review

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Establishing the integrated science of movement: bringing together concepts and methods from animal and human movement analysis

    Demsar, U., Long, J., Benitez-Paez, F., Brum-Bastos, V., Marion, S., Martin, G., Sekulic, S., Smolak, K., Zein, B. & Sila-Nowicka, K., 19 Feb 2021, In: International Journal of Geographical Information Science. Latest Articles, 36 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

  2. Integrated science of movement

    Demsar, U., Long, J. & Sila-Nowicka, K., 21 Dec 2020, In: Journal of Spatial Information Science. 2020, 21, p. 25-31

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Multi-source data fusion of optical satellite imagery to characterize habitat selection from wildlife tracking data

    Brum-Bastos, V., Long, J., Church, K., Robson, G., de Paula, R. & Demsar, U., Nov 2020, In: Ecological Informatics. 60, 101149.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Potential path volume (PPV): a geometric estimator for space use in 3D

    Demšar, U. & Long, J. A., 29 Apr 2019, In: Movement Ecology. 7, 14 p., 14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Weather effects on human mobility: a study using multi-channel sequence analysis

    Brum-Bastos, V. S., Long, J. A. & Demsar, U., 23 May 2018, In: Computers, Environment and Urban Systems. In press, 22 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. A subtropical embayment serves as essential habitat for sub-adults and adults of the critically endangered smalltooth sawfish

    Papastamatiou, Y. P., Dean Grubbs, R., Imhoff, J. L., Gulak, S. J. B., Carlson, J. K. & Burgess, G. H., Jan 2015, In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 3, p. 764-775 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Estimating density of secretive terrestrial birds (Siamese Fireback) in pristine and degraded forest using camera traps and distance sampling

    Suwanrat, S., Ngoprasert, D., Sutherland, C., Suwanwaree, P. & Savini, T., 2015, In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 3, p. 596-606 11 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Do species conservation assessments capture genetic diversity?

    Rivers, M. C., Brummitt, N., Nic Lughadha, E. & Meagher, T. R., Dec 2014, In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 2, p. 81-87 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Long-term trends in the use of a protected area by small cetaceans in relation to changes in population status

    Cheney, B., Corkery, R., Durban, J., Grellier, K., Hammond, P. S., Islas Villanueva, V., Janik, V. M., Lusseau, S., Parsons, K., Quick, N. J., Wilson, B. & Thompson, P., Dec 2014, In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 2, p. 118-128 11 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 265684240

Top