Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Standard

Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture. / DeRuiter, Stacy L.; Bahr, Alexander; Blanchet, Marie-Anne; Hansen, Sabina Fobian; Kristensen, Jakob Hojer; Madsen, Peter T.; Tyack, Peter L.; Wahlberg, Magnus.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 212, No. 19, 01.10.2009, p. 3100-3107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

DeRuiter, SL, Bahr, A, Blanchet, M-A, Hansen, SF, Kristensen, JH, Madsen, PT, Tyack, PL & Wahlberg, M 2009, 'Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture' Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 212, no. 19, pp. 3100-3107. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.030825

APA

DeRuiter, S. L., Bahr, A., Blanchet, M-A., Hansen, S. F., Kristensen, J. H., Madsen, P. T., ... Wahlberg, M. (2009). Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture. Journal of Experimental Biology, 212(19), 3100-3107. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.030825

Vancouver

DeRuiter SL, Bahr A, Blanchet M-A, Hansen SF, Kristensen JH, Madsen PT et al. Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture. Journal of Experimental Biology. 2009 Oct 1;212(19):3100-3107. https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.030825

Author

DeRuiter, Stacy L. ; Bahr, Alexander ; Blanchet, Marie-Anne ; Hansen, Sabina Fobian ; Kristensen, Jakob Hojer ; Madsen, Peter T. ; Tyack, Peter L. ; Wahlberg, Magnus. / Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture. In: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2009 ; Vol. 212, No. 19. pp. 3100-3107.

Bibtex - Download

@article{3439f6d6494944228ba6fb4b926c07dc,
title = "Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture",
abstract = "Porpoise echolocation has been studied previously, mainly in target detection experiments using stationed animals and steel sphere targets, but little is known about the acoustic behaviour of free-swimming porpoises echolocating for prey. Here, we used small onboard sound and orientation recording tags to study the echolocation behaviour of free-swimming trained porpoises as they caught dead, freely drifting fish. We analysed porpoise echolocation behaviour leading up to and following prey capture events, including variability in echolocation in response to vision restriction, prey species, and individual porpoise tested. The porpoises produced echolocation clicks as they searched for the fish, followed by fast-repetition-rate clicks (echolocation buzzes) when acquiring prey. During buzzes, which usually began when porpoises were about 1-2 body lengths from prey, tag-recorded click levels decreased by about 10 dB, click rates increased to over 300 clicks per second, and variability in body orientation (roll) increased. Buzzes generally continued beyond the first contact with the fish, and often extended until or after the end of prey handling. This unexplained continuation of buzzes after prey capture raises questions about the function of buzzes, suggesting that in addition to providing detailed information on target location during the capture, they may serve additional purposes such as the relocation of potentially escaping prey. We conclude that porpoises display the same overall acoustic prey capture behaviour seen in larger toothed whales in the wild, albeit at a faster pace, clicking slowly during search and approach phases and buzzing during prey capture.",
author = "DeRuiter, {Stacy L.} and Alexander Bahr and Marie-Anne Blanchet and Hansen, {Sabina Fobian} and Kristensen, {Jakob Hojer} and Madsen, {Peter T.} and Tyack, {Peter L.} and Magnus Wahlberg",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1242/jeb.030825",
language = "English",
volume = "212",
pages = "3100--3107",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Biology",
issn = "0022-0949",
publisher = "Company of Biologists Ltd",
number = "19",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acoustic behaviour of echolocating porpoises during prey capture

AU - DeRuiter, Stacy L.

AU - Bahr, Alexander

AU - Blanchet, Marie-Anne

AU - Hansen, Sabina Fobian

AU - Kristensen, Jakob Hojer

AU - Madsen, Peter T.

AU - Tyack, Peter L.

AU - Wahlberg, Magnus

PY - 2009/10/1

Y1 - 2009/10/1

N2 - Porpoise echolocation has been studied previously, mainly in target detection experiments using stationed animals and steel sphere targets, but little is known about the acoustic behaviour of free-swimming porpoises echolocating for prey. Here, we used small onboard sound and orientation recording tags to study the echolocation behaviour of free-swimming trained porpoises as they caught dead, freely drifting fish. We analysed porpoise echolocation behaviour leading up to and following prey capture events, including variability in echolocation in response to vision restriction, prey species, and individual porpoise tested. The porpoises produced echolocation clicks as they searched for the fish, followed by fast-repetition-rate clicks (echolocation buzzes) when acquiring prey. During buzzes, which usually began when porpoises were about 1-2 body lengths from prey, tag-recorded click levels decreased by about 10 dB, click rates increased to over 300 clicks per second, and variability in body orientation (roll) increased. Buzzes generally continued beyond the first contact with the fish, and often extended until or after the end of prey handling. This unexplained continuation of buzzes after prey capture raises questions about the function of buzzes, suggesting that in addition to providing detailed information on target location during the capture, they may serve additional purposes such as the relocation of potentially escaping prey. We conclude that porpoises display the same overall acoustic prey capture behaviour seen in larger toothed whales in the wild, albeit at a faster pace, clicking slowly during search and approach phases and buzzing during prey capture.

AB - Porpoise echolocation has been studied previously, mainly in target detection experiments using stationed animals and steel sphere targets, but little is known about the acoustic behaviour of free-swimming porpoises echolocating for prey. Here, we used small onboard sound and orientation recording tags to study the echolocation behaviour of free-swimming trained porpoises as they caught dead, freely drifting fish. We analysed porpoise echolocation behaviour leading up to and following prey capture events, including variability in echolocation in response to vision restriction, prey species, and individual porpoise tested. The porpoises produced echolocation clicks as they searched for the fish, followed by fast-repetition-rate clicks (echolocation buzzes) when acquiring prey. During buzzes, which usually began when porpoises were about 1-2 body lengths from prey, tag-recorded click levels decreased by about 10 dB, click rates increased to over 300 clicks per second, and variability in body orientation (roll) increased. Buzzes generally continued beyond the first contact with the fish, and often extended until or after the end of prey handling. This unexplained continuation of buzzes after prey capture raises questions about the function of buzzes, suggesting that in addition to providing detailed information on target location during the capture, they may serve additional purposes such as the relocation of potentially escaping prey. We conclude that porpoises display the same overall acoustic prey capture behaviour seen in larger toothed whales in the wild, albeit at a faster pace, clicking slowly during search and approach phases and buzzing during prey capture.

U2 - 10.1242/jeb.030825

DO - 10.1242/jeb.030825

M3 - Article

VL - 212

SP - 3100

EP - 3107

JO - Journal of Experimental Biology

T2 - Journal of Experimental Biology

JF - Journal of Experimental Biology

SN - 0022-0949

IS - 19

ER -

Related by author

  1. A response to scientific and societal needs for marine biological observations

    Bax, N., Miloslavich, P., Muller-Karger, F. E., Allain, V., Appeltans, W., Batten, S. D., Benedetti-Cecchi, L., Buttigieg, P. L., Chiba, S., Costa, D. P., Duffy, J. E., Dunn, D. C., Johnson, C. R., Kudela, R. M., Obura, D., Rebelo, L-M., Shin, Y-J., Simmons, S. E. & Tyack, P. L., 17 Jul 2019, In : Frontiers in Marine Science. 6, 22 p., 395.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Evidence for discrimination between feeding sounds of familiar fish and unfamiliar mammal-eating killer whale ecotypes by long-finned pilot whales

    Curé, C., Isojunno, S., I Vester, H., Visser, F., Oudejans, M., Biassoni, N., Massenet, M., Barluet de Beauchesne, L., J Wensveen, P., Sivle, L. D., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 22 Jun 2019, In : Animal Cognition. First Online, 20 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Foraging rates of ram-filtering North Atlantic right whales

    van der Hoop, J. M., Nousek-McGregor, A. E., Nowacek, D. P., Parks, S. E., Tyack, P. & Madsen, P. T., 10 Jun 2019, In : Functional Ecology. Early View, 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Northern bottlenose whales in a pristine environment respond strongly to close and distant navy sonar signals

    Wensveen, P. J., Isojunno, S., Hansen, R. R., Von Benda-beckmann, A. M., Kleivane, L., Van Ijsselmuide, S., Lam, F. A., Kvadsheim, P. H., Deruiter, S. L., Curé, C., Narazaki, T., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 20 Mar 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1899, 10 p., 20182592.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Diving behavior and fine-scale kinematics of free-ranging Risso’s dolphins foraging in shallow and deep-water habitats

    Arranz, P., Benoit-Bird, K., Friedlaender, A. S., Hazen, E. L., Goldbogen, J. A., Stimpert, A. K., De Ruiter, S. L., Calambokidis, J., Southall, B., Fahlman, A. & Tyack, P. L., 12 Mar 2019, In : Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 7, 15 p., 53.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Behavioral responses of individual blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) to mid-frequency military sonar

    Southall, B., DeRuiter, S., Friedlaender, A., Stimpert, A., Goldbogen, J., Hazen, E., Casey, C., Fregosi, S., Cade, D., Allen, A., Harris, C. M., Schorr, G., Moretti, D., Guan, S. & Calambokidis, J., Mar 2019, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 222, 15 p., jeb190637.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Dolphin echolocation behaviour during active long-range target approaches

    Ladegaard, M., Mulsow, J., Houser, D. S., Jensen, F. H., Johnson, M., Madsen, P. T. & Finneran, J. J., 25 Jan 2019, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 222, 12 p., jeb189217.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. No experimental evidence of stress-induced hyperthermia in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Jones, N. A. R., Mendo, T., Broell, F. & Webster, M. M., 24 Jan 2019, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 222, 2, 8 p., jeb.192971.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Dive heart rate in harbour porpoises is influenced by exercise and expectations

    McDonald, B., Johnson, M. & Madsen, P., 9 Jan 2018, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 221, 1, jeb168740.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 20035915