Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation: efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Standard

Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation : efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions. / Gotz, Thomas; Janik, Vincent M.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 492, 31.10.2013, p. 285-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gotz, T & Janik, VM 2013, 'Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation: efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions' Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 492, pp. 285-302. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10482

APA

Gotz, T., & Janik, V. M. (2013). Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation: efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 492, 285-302. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10482

Vancouver

Gotz T, Janik VM. Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation: efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2013 Oct 31;492:285-302. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps10482

Author

Gotz, Thomas ; Janik, Vincent M. / Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation : efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2013 ; Vol. 492. pp. 285-302.

Bibtex - Download

@article{cc22e7701f564fa580c0e2b753ee5c1d,
title = "Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation: efficiency, conservation concerns and possible solutions",
abstract = "Acoustic deterrent devices (ADDs) to prevent pinniped predation on fish farms and fisheries are widely used, but show highly varying success. Recently, ADDs have also been highlighted as a conservation concern due to their adverse impact on toothed whales. We review the available literature on the efficiency of commercial ADDs, evaluate the unintended impact on behaviour, communication and hearing of marine life, and suggest solutions based on psychophysiologicalpredictions. The main problems associated with ADDs are a lack of long-term efficiency, introduction of substantial noise pollution to the marine environment and long-term effects on target and non-target species. Odontocetes have more sensitive hearing than pinnipeds at the frequencies where most ADDs operate, which may explain the reported large-scale habitat exclusion of odontocetes when ADDs are used. Furthermore, long-term exposure to ADDs may damagethe hearing of marine mammals. Fish and invertebrates have less sensitive hearing than marine mammals and fewer efforts have been made to quantify the effects of noise on these taxa. Solutions can be found by decreasing sound exposure, exploiting neuronal reflex arcs associated with flight behaviour and making use of differences in species’ hearing abilities to increase targetspecificity. To minimise adverse effects, environmental impact assessments should be carried out before deploying ADDs and only effective and target-specific devices should be used.",
keywords = "Acoustic deterrent device, ADD, Noise pollution, Predation, Seal, Hearing damage, Aquaculture, Fisheries, Temporary threshold shift, Permanent threshold shift",
author = "Thomas Gotz and Janik, {Vincent M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "31",
doi = "10.3354/meps10482",
language = "English",
volume = "492",
pages = "285--302",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acoustic deterrent devices to prevent pinniped depredation

T2 - Marine Ecology Progress Series

AU - Gotz, Thomas

AU - Janik, Vincent M.

PY - 2013/10/31

Y1 - 2013/10/31

N2 - Acoustic deterrent devices (ADDs) to prevent pinniped predation on fish farms and fisheries are widely used, but show highly varying success. Recently, ADDs have also been highlighted as a conservation concern due to their adverse impact on toothed whales. We review the available literature on the efficiency of commercial ADDs, evaluate the unintended impact on behaviour, communication and hearing of marine life, and suggest solutions based on psychophysiologicalpredictions. The main problems associated with ADDs are a lack of long-term efficiency, introduction of substantial noise pollution to the marine environment and long-term effects on target and non-target species. Odontocetes have more sensitive hearing than pinnipeds at the frequencies where most ADDs operate, which may explain the reported large-scale habitat exclusion of odontocetes when ADDs are used. Furthermore, long-term exposure to ADDs may damagethe hearing of marine mammals. Fish and invertebrates have less sensitive hearing than marine mammals and fewer efforts have been made to quantify the effects of noise on these taxa. Solutions can be found by decreasing sound exposure, exploiting neuronal reflex arcs associated with flight behaviour and making use of differences in species’ hearing abilities to increase targetspecificity. To minimise adverse effects, environmental impact assessments should be carried out before deploying ADDs and only effective and target-specific devices should be used.

AB - Acoustic deterrent devices (ADDs) to prevent pinniped predation on fish farms and fisheries are widely used, but show highly varying success. Recently, ADDs have also been highlighted as a conservation concern due to their adverse impact on toothed whales. We review the available literature on the efficiency of commercial ADDs, evaluate the unintended impact on behaviour, communication and hearing of marine life, and suggest solutions based on psychophysiologicalpredictions. The main problems associated with ADDs are a lack of long-term efficiency, introduction of substantial noise pollution to the marine environment and long-term effects on target and non-target species. Odontocetes have more sensitive hearing than pinnipeds at the frequencies where most ADDs operate, which may explain the reported large-scale habitat exclusion of odontocetes when ADDs are used. Furthermore, long-term exposure to ADDs may damagethe hearing of marine mammals. Fish and invertebrates have less sensitive hearing than marine mammals and fewer efforts have been made to quantify the effects of noise on these taxa. Solutions can be found by decreasing sound exposure, exploiting neuronal reflex arcs associated with flight behaviour and making use of differences in species’ hearing abilities to increase targetspecificity. To minimise adverse effects, environmental impact assessments should be carried out before deploying ADDs and only effective and target-specific devices should be used.

KW - Acoustic deterrent device

KW - ADD

KW - Noise pollution

KW - Predation

KW - Seal

KW - Hearing damage

KW - Aquaculture

KW - Fisheries

KW - Temporary threshold shift

KW - Permanent threshold shift

U2 - 10.3354/meps10482

DO - 10.3354/meps10482

M3 - Article

VL - 492

SP - 285

EP - 302

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

Related by author

  1. Effects of impulsive noise on marine mammals: investigating range-dependent risk

    Hastie, G., Merchant, N., Goetz, T., Russell, D. J. F., Thompson, P. & Janik, V. M., Jul 2019, In : Ecological Applications. 29, 5, 10 p., e01906.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Can fear conditioning repel California sea lions from fishing activities?

    Schakner, Z. A., Götz, T., Janik, V. M. & Blumstein, D. T., Oct 2017, In : Animal Conservation. 20, 5, p. 425-432 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. The startle reflex in acoustic deterrence: an approach with universal applicability?

    Goetz, T. & Janik, V. M., 20 Jun 2016, In : Animal Conservation. 19, p. 225-226

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Potential uses of anthropogenic noise as a source of information in animal sensory and communication systems

    Stansbury, A., Deecke, V., Gotz, T. & Janik, V. M., 1 Jan 2016, The Effects of Noise on Aquatic Life II. Popper, A. N. & Hawkins, A. (eds.). Springer, p. 1105-1111 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; vol. 875).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Related by journal

  1. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Member of editorial board)
    12 Jul 2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Sophie Caroline Smout (Reviewer)
    1 Mar 201630 Mar 2016

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Nora Nell Hanson (Reviewer)
    Dec 2013

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  4. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Andrew Stuart Brierley (Editor)
    20092011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Behavioural ontogeny of bearded seals Erignathus barbatus through the first year of life

    Hamilton, C. D., Lydersen, C., Fedak, M. A., Freitas, C., Hindell, M. A. & Kovacs, K. M., 18 Jul 2019, In : Marine Ecology Progress Series.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Habitat use of culturally distinct Galápagos sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus clans

    Eguiguren, A., Pirotta, E., Cantor, M., Rendell, L. & Whitehead, H., 17 Jan 2019, In : Marine Ecology Progress Series. 609, p. 257-270

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Spatio-temporal patterns in fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) habitat use in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    Schleimer, A. C. H., Ramp, C., Plourde, S., Lehoux, C., Sears, R. & Hammond, P. S., 30 Jul 2019, In : Marine Ecology Progress Series. 623, p. 221-234

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Context-dependent reduction in somatic condition of wild Atlantic salmon infested with sea lice

    Susdorf, R., Salama, N., Todd, C. D., Hillman, R., Elsmere, P. & Lusseau, D., 15 Nov 2018, In : Marine Ecology Progress Series. 606, p. 91-104

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Cumulative effects of cyclones and bleaching on coral cover and species richness at Lizard Island

    Madin, J. S., Baird, A. H., Bridge, T. C. L., Connolly, S. R., Zawada, K. J. A. & Dornelas, M., 4 Oct 2018, In : Marine Ecology Progress Series. 604, p. 263-268 6 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 67863410