Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Adiposity and response to an obesity prevention intervention in Pakistani and Bangladeshi primary school boys and girls: a secondary analysis using the BEACHeS feasibility study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Geneviève Cezard, Narinder Bansal, Raj Bhopal, Miranda Pallan, Paramjit Gill, Timothy Barrett, Peymane Adab

Abstract

Objectives: As a secondary analysis of the BEACHeS study, we hypothesised there would be sex differences in Pakistani and Bangladeshi school children when examining adiposity and their response to an obesity intervention.
Design: The Birmingham healthy Eating and Active lifestyle for CHildren Study (BEACHeS) was designed as a Phase II feasibility study of a complex intervention. Setting: 8 primary schools with predominantly South Asian children in Birmingham, UK.
Participants: 1090 pupils (aged 5-7 years old) from school year 1 and 2 were allocated at school level to receive an intervention. A total of 574 were enrolled in the study with consent. We focused on the 466 children of Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin (50.6% boys).
Intervention: Delivered between 2007 and 2009, the 1-year obesity prevention intervention targeted school and family-based dietary and physical activities. Primary and secondary outcome measures and analysis: Adiposity measures including skinfold thickness were compared by sex at baseline and follow-up. Gains in adiposity measures were compared between control and intervention arms in boys and in girls. Measures were compared using two-sample t tests and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum tests according to normality distribution. Results At baseline, girls had larger skinfold measures at all sites compared to boys although body mass index (BMI) was similar (eg, median subscapular skinfold 6.6 mm vs 5.7 mm; p<0.001). At follow-up, girls in the intervention group gained less weight and adiposity compared to respective controls (p<0.05 for weight, BMI, waist circumference, central and thigh skinfold) with a median total skinfold gain of 7.0?mm in the control group compared to 0.3 mm in the intervention group.
Conclusions: Our secondary analysis suggests differences in adiposity in Pakistani and Bangladeshi girls and boys and in the effect of the intervention reducing adiposity in girls. These preliminary findings indicate that including sex differences should be examined in future trials.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere007907
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2016

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Complex differences in infection rates between ethnic groups in Scotland: a retrospective, national census-linked cohort study of 1.65 million cases

    Gruer, L. D., Cézard, G. I., Wallace, L. A., Hutchinson, S. J., Douglas, A. F., Buchanan, D., Katikireddi, S. V., Millard, A. D., Goldberg, D. J., Sheikh, A. & Bhopal, R. S., 22 Jan 2021, In: Journal of Public Health.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Ethnic differences in self-assessed health in Scotland: the role of socio-economic status and migrant generation

    Cézard, G., Finney, N., Kulu, H. & Marshall, A., 4 Nov 2020, In: Population, Space and Place. Early View, 16 p., e2403.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Are there ethnic and religious variations in uptake of bowel cancer screening? A retrospective cohort study among 1.7 million people in Scotland

    Campbell, C., Douglas, A., Williams, L., Cezard, G., Brewster, D. H., Buchanan, D., Robb, K., Stanners, G., Weller, D., Steele, R. JC., Steiner, M. & Bhopal, R., 7 Oct 2020, In: BMJ Open. 10, 10, 11 p., e037011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Diabetes incidence in a high-risk UK population at 7 years: linkage of the Prevention of Diabetes and Obesity in South Asians (PODOSA) trial to the Scottish Diabetes Register

    Bhopal, R., Douglas, A., Cezard, G., Gill, J. M. R., Lean, M. E. J., McKnight, J., Sattar, N., Tuomilehto, J., Wallia, S., Sheikh, A. & Wild, S. H., 19 Sep 2020, In: Diabetic Medicine. Early View, e14369.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Mentoring as an intervention to promote gender equality in academic medicine: a systematic review

    House, A., Dracup, N., Burkinshaw, P., Ward, V. & Bryant, L. D., 26 Jan 2021, In: BMJ Open. 11, 1, 11 p., e040355.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Protocol for the development of the Wales multimorbidity e-Cohort (WMC): data sources and methods to construct a population-based research platform to investigate multi-morbidity

    Lyons, J., Akbari, A., Agrawal, U., Harper, G., Azcoaga-Lorenzo, A., Bailey, R., Rafferty, J., Watkins, A., Fry, R., McCowan, C., Dezateux, C., Robson, J. P., Peek, N., Holmes, C., Denaxas, S., Owen, R., Abrams, K. R., John, A., O'Reilly, D., Richardson, S. & 9 others, Hall, M., Gale, C. P., Davies, J., Davies, C., Cross, L., Gallacher, J., Chess, J., Brookes, A. J. & Lyons, R. A., Jan 2021, In: BMJ Open. 11, 1, 8 p., e047101.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. What is the recovery rate and risk of long-term consequences following a diagnosis of COVID-19? A harmonised, global longitudinal observational study protocol

    Sigfrid, L., Cevik, M., Jesudason, E., Lim, W. S., Rello, J., Amuasi, J., Bozza, F., Palmieri, C., Munblit, D., Holter, J. C., Kildal, A. B., Reyes, L. F., Russell, C. D., Ho, A., Turtle, L., Drake, T. M., Beltrame, A., Hann, K., Bangura, I. R., Fowler, R. & 17 others, Lakoh, S., Berry, C., Lowe, D. J., McPeake, J., Hashmi, M., Dyrhol-Riise, A. M., Donohue, C., Plotkin, D., Hardwick, H., Elkheir, N., Lone, N. I., Docherty, A., Harrison, E., Baille, J. K., Carson, G., Semple, M. G. & Scott, J. T., Mar 2021, In: BMJ Open. 11, 3, 8 p., e043887.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 249995216

Top