Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Age at the onset of tobacco smoking in South Africa: a discrete-time survival analysis of the prognostic factors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Adeniyi Fagbamigbe, Rachana Desai, Ronael Sewpaul, Ngianga-Bakwin Kandala, Derrick Sekgala, Priscilla Reddy

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Background: While knowledge of onset of smoking tobacco, and associated risk factors can aid the formulation of evidence-based policy and interventions, such information is scarce in South Africa. We assessed age at onset of tobacco smoking in South Africa and identified its risk factors.
Methods: We analysed data of 15,316 respondents aged 15–98 years from the 2012 South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Descriptive statistics and survival analysis techniques were used alongside weighted percentages.
Results: Overall lifetime prevalence of smoking was 20.5%. Among the 3360 ever-smoked respondents, the overall median age at smoking onset was 18 years (Inter-quartile range (IQR) =5) with 2% starting before age 10 while 60% had smoked before age 20. Likelihood of tobacco smoking was higher among adolescents (<=20 years) and those aged 20–29 years than those aged > = 60 years, thrice higher among males, 29% higher among urban dwellers and thrice higher in Western Cape and Free State than in North West Province. The onset of tobacco smoking was earlier among males, wealthier and “coloured” people from Northern and Eastern Capes.
Conclusion: The onset of tobacco smoking peaked at 15–22 years and varied by province, sex, location, race and other characteristics. The age restrictions on smoking in South Africa has changed over time, coupled with the recent open and electronic advertisement of tobacco, and social media could have influenced the earlier onset of tobacco smoking in South Africa. Stricter regulations on tobacco-related advertisement and sales should be implemented.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number128
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Public Health
Volume78
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2020

    Research areas

  • Tobacco smoking, South Africa, Birth cohorts, Sex, Race, Tobacco advertisement

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Mind the gap: what explains the rural-nonrural inequality in diarrhoea among under-five children in low and medium-income countries? A decomposition analysis

    Fagbamigbe, A. F., Oyinlola, F. F., Morakinyo, O. M., Adebowale, A. S., Fagbamigbe, O. S. & Uthman, A. O., 23 Mar 2021, In: BMC Public Health. 21, 15 p., 575.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Performance evaluation of survival regression models in analysing Swedish dental implant complication data with frailty

    Fagbamigbe, A. F., Karlsson, K., Derks, J. & Petzold, M., 7 Jan 2021, In: PLoS ONE. 16, 1, 16 p., e0245111.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Mind the gap: what explains the poor-non-poor inequalities in severe wasting among under-five children in low- and middle-income countries? Compositional and structural characteristics

    Fagbamigbe, A. F., Kandala, N. B. & Uthman, O. A., 3 Nov 2020, In: PLoS ONE. 15, 11, 21 p., e0241416.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Barriers to antenatal care use in Nigeria: Evidences from non-users and implications for maternal health programming

    Fagbamigbe, A. F. & Idemudia, E. S., 17 Apr 2015, In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 15, 1, 95.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Gender variation in self-reported likelihood of HIV infection in comparison with HIV test results in rural and urban Nigeria

    Fagbamigbe, A. F., Akinyemi, J. O., Adedokun, B. O. & Bamgboye, E. A., 21 Dec 2011, In: AIDS Research and Therapy. 8, 44.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 271331544

Top