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Arguing Out of Bounds: Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

Arguing Out of Bounds : Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism. / Perry, John.

Religion in a Liberal State. ed. / Gavin D'Costa; Malcolm Evans; Tariq Modood; Julian Rivers. Cambridge University Press, 2013. p. 219-243.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Perry, J 2013, Arguing Out of Bounds: Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism. in G D'Costa, M Evans, T Modood & J Rivers (eds), Religion in a Liberal State. Cambridge University Press, pp. 219-243.

APA

Perry, J. (2013). Arguing Out of Bounds: Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism. In G. D'Costa, M. Evans, T. Modood, & J. Rivers (Eds.), Religion in a Liberal State (pp. 219-243). Cambridge University Press.

Vancouver

Perry J. Arguing Out of Bounds: Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism. In D'Costa G, Evans M, Modood T, Rivers J, editors, Religion in a Liberal State. Cambridge University Press. 2013. p. 219-243

Author

Perry, John. / Arguing Out of Bounds : Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism. Religion in a Liberal State. editor / Gavin D'Costa ; Malcolm Evans ; Tariq Modood ; Julian Rivers. Cambridge University Press, 2013. pp. 219-243

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{83f0355f28b8490fa7fc5d75c8b6835f,
title = "Arguing Out of Bounds: Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism",
abstract = "I describe the state of the debate about religious reasons in public, at least how that debate appears from within theology. I begin by identifying the historical roots of this debate in classical and contemporary liberalism, especially in John Rawls’ notion of public reason. I will argue that we have reason to reject Rawls’ restrictions on public discourse and, furthermore, a consensus is now forming to this effect. The inadequacies of this position are well-captured in an exchange between the philosophers Richard Rorty and Nicholas Wolterstorff, where Rorty begins by advocating Rawlsian public reason but then abandons it. I conclude by arguing that although public discourse should not be guided by neutral principles, this does not mean it should be unguided by anything at all. One place that Christians in particular might look for guidance is classical and Christian rhetoric, in which public speech is a moral practice. As such, some contributions are better or worse than others. That is, they excel in rhetorical excellence; what Christian rhetoricians called eloquence.",
keywords = "public reason, Rawls, Rorty, Wolterstorff, eloquence, Cicero, rhetoric, Raymond Plant, secularization",
author = "John Perry",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-107-65007-7",
pages = "219--243",
editor = "Gavin D'Costa and Malcolm Evans and Tariq Modood and Julian Rivers",
booktitle = "Religion in a Liberal State",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Arguing Out of Bounds

T2 - Christian Eloquence and the End of Johannine Liberalism

AU - Perry, John

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - I describe the state of the debate about religious reasons in public, at least how that debate appears from within theology. I begin by identifying the historical roots of this debate in classical and contemporary liberalism, especially in John Rawls’ notion of public reason. I will argue that we have reason to reject Rawls’ restrictions on public discourse and, furthermore, a consensus is now forming to this effect. The inadequacies of this position are well-captured in an exchange between the philosophers Richard Rorty and Nicholas Wolterstorff, where Rorty begins by advocating Rawlsian public reason but then abandons it. I conclude by arguing that although public discourse should not be guided by neutral principles, this does not mean it should be unguided by anything at all. One place that Christians in particular might look for guidance is classical and Christian rhetoric, in which public speech is a moral practice. As such, some contributions are better or worse than others. That is, they excel in rhetorical excellence; what Christian rhetoricians called eloquence.

AB - I describe the state of the debate about religious reasons in public, at least how that debate appears from within theology. I begin by identifying the historical roots of this debate in classical and contemporary liberalism, especially in John Rawls’ notion of public reason. I will argue that we have reason to reject Rawls’ restrictions on public discourse and, furthermore, a consensus is now forming to this effect. The inadequacies of this position are well-captured in an exchange between the philosophers Richard Rorty and Nicholas Wolterstorff, where Rorty begins by advocating Rawlsian public reason but then abandons it. I conclude by arguing that although public discourse should not be guided by neutral principles, this does not mean it should be unguided by anything at all. One place that Christians in particular might look for guidance is classical and Christian rhetoric, in which public speech is a moral practice. As such, some contributions are better or worse than others. That is, they excel in rhetorical excellence; what Christian rhetoricians called eloquence.

KW - public reason

KW - Rawls

KW - Rorty

KW - Wolterstorff

KW - eloquence

KW - Cicero

KW - rhetoric

KW - Raymond Plant

KW - secularization

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-1-107-65007-7

SP - 219

EP - 243

BT - Religion in a Liberal State

A2 - D'Costa, Gavin

A2 - Evans, Malcolm

A2 - Modood, Tariq

A2 - Rivers, Julian

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -

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ID: 65564048