Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Asymmetry in pay-off predicts how familiar individuals respond to one another

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Abstract

Familiarity influences individual decision-making in many vertebrate species. Here, we propose that familiarity modulates behaviour to different extents depending on the social context of the interaction. Specifically, the more that one player stands to gain relative to the other, the less important familiarity will be in influencing their responses to one another. We test this prediction using pairs of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in three competitive scenarios of increasing asymmetry in outcome to the two players: schooling under potential threat (similar outcomes), competing for a defensible food source (some asymmetry) and competing for a receptive female (strongly asymmetrical outcomes). Males show a graded response as asymmetry increases, with familiarity producing marked behavioural differences under potential threat, minor changes when competing for food, but none at all in competition for mating opportunities. This suggests that mutualistic benefits can arise as a by-product of selfish behaviour, supporting the role of pseudo-reciprocity in the evolution of cooperation.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number20130025
Number of pages4
JournalBiology Letters
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2013

    Research areas

  • reciprocity, fish, by-product mutualism, decision-making, GUPPY POECILIA-RETICULATA, SOCIAL-BEHAVIOR, PREDATION RISK, SEA-TROUT, COOPERATION, EVOLUTION, FISH, RECOGNITION, SHOAL, TIT

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. A balance of winners and losers in the Anthropocene

    Dornelas, M., Gotelli, N. J., Shimadzu, H., Moyes, F., Magurran, A. E. & McGill, B. J., 15 Mar 2019, In : Ecology Letters. 22, 5, p. 847-854 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Me against who? Male guppies adjust mating behaviour according to their rival’s presence and attractiveness

    Órfão, I., Barbosa, M., Ojanguren, A. F., Vicente, L., Varela, S. & Magurran, A. E., 22 Mar 2019, In : Ethology. Early View, p. 1-10

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. β-diversity scaling patterns are consistent across metrics and taxa

    Antão, L. H., McGill, B., Magurran, A. E., Soares, A. & Dornelas, M., 25 Jan 2019, In : Ecography. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Change in the dominance structure of two marine-fish assemblages over three decades

    Moyes, F. & Magurran, A. E., Jan 2019, In : Journal of Fish Biology. 94, 1, p. 96-102 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Simulating shifts in taxonomic and functional β-diversity of ray-finned fishes: probing the Mariana disaster

    Trindade-Santos, I., Eduardo, A. A., Moyes, F., Martinez, P. A., Magurran, A. E. & Gouveia, S. F., Dec 2018, In : Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 16, 4, p. 186-192 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Adaptive suicide: is a kin-selected driver of fatal behaviours likely?

    Humphreys, R. K. & Ruxton, G. D., 27 Feb 2019, In : Biology Letters. 15, 2, 20180823.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Raw-material selectivity in hook-tool-crafting New Caledonian crows

    Klump, B. C., Cantat, M. & Rutz, C., Feb 2019, In : Biology Letters. 15, 2, 6 p., 20180836.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Dominance structure of assemblages is regulated over a period of rapid environmental change

    Jones, F. A. M. & Magurran, A. E., Jun 2018, In : Biology Letters. 14, 6

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Inclusive fitness for in-laws

    Dyble, M., Gardner, A., Vinicius, L. & Migliano, A., Oct 2018, In : Biology Letters. 14, 10

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Tail walking in a bottlenose dolphin community: the rise and fall of an arbitrary cultural 'fad'

    Bossley, M., Steiner, A., Brakes, P., Shrimpton, J., Foster, C. & Rendell, L., Sep 2018, In : Biology Letters. 14, 9, 5 p., 20180314.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Graeme Douglas Ruxton (Editor)
    2012 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Karen Anne Spencer (Member of editorial board)
    1 Apr 2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  3. Biology Letters (Journal)

    David Michael Shuker (Member of editorial board)
    2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Josep Call (Member of editorial board)
    20072013

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Richard William Byrne (Member of editorial board)
    20072012

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

ID: 80447898