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Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy

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Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy. / Shao, Jun; Stott, Lowell D.; Gray, William R.; Greenop, Rosanna; Pecher, Ingo; Neil, Helen L.; Coffin, Richard B.; Davy, Bryan; Rae, James W. B.

In: Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, Vol. Early View, 29.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Shao, J, Stott, LD, Gray, WR, Greenop, R, Pecher, I, Neil, HL, Coffin, RB, Davy, B & Rae, JWB 2019, 'Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy', Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, vol. Early View. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018PA003498

APA

Shao, J., Stott, L. D., Gray, W. R., Greenop, R., Pecher, I., Neil, H. L., Coffin, R. B., Davy, B., & Rae, J. W. B. (2019). Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, Early View. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018PA003498

Vancouver

Shao J, Stott LD, Gray WR, Greenop R, Pecher I, Neil HL et al. Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology. 2019 Oct 29;Early View. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018PA003498

Author

Shao, Jun ; Stott, Lowell D. ; Gray, William R. ; Greenop, Rosanna ; Pecher, Ingo ; Neil, Helen L. ; Coffin, Richard B. ; Davy, Bryan ; Rae, James W. B. / Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy. In: Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology. 2019 ; Vol. Early View.

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@article{fc36d7142ffd4e038eb0e9619aa704ef,
title = "Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy",
abstract = "Identifying processes within the Earth System that have modulated atmospheric pCO2 during each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene stands as one of the grand challenges in climate science. The growing array of surface ocean pH estimates from the boron isotope proxy across the last glacial termination may reveal regions of the ocean that influenced the timing and magnitude of pCO2 rise. Here we present two new boron isotope records from the subtropical‐subpolar transition zone of the Southwest Pacific that span the last 20 kyr, as well as new radiocarbon data from the same cores. The new data suggest this region was a source of carbon to the atmosphere rather than a moderate sink as it is today. Significantly higher outgassing is observed between ~16.5‐14 kyrBP, associated with increasing δ13C and [CO3]2‐ at depth, suggesting loss of carbon from the intermediate ocean to the atmosphere. We use these new boron isotope records together with existing records to build a composite pH/pCO2 curve for the surface oceans. pH disequilibrium/CO2 outgassing was widespread throughout the last deglaciation, likely explained by upwelling of CO2 from the deep/intermediate ocean. During the Holocene, a smaller outgassing peak is observed at a time of relatively stable atmospheric CO2, which may be explained by regrowth of the terrestrial biosphere countering ocean CO2 release. Our stack is likely biased toward upwelling/CO2 source regions. Nevertheless, the composite pCO2 curve provides robust evidence that various parts of the ocean were releasing CO2 to the atmosphere over the last 25 kyr.",
author = "Jun Shao and Stott, {Lowell D.} and Gray, {William R.} and Rosanna Greenop and Ingo Pecher and Neil, {Helen L.} and Coffin, {Richard B.} and Bryan Davy and Rae, {James W. B.}",
note = "J. Shao and L.D. Stott were supported by an NSF grant (MG&G 1558990). W. R. Gray and R. Greenop were supported by NERC grants NE/N011716/1 and NE/N011716/1 to J.W.B. Rae. I. Pecher, H.L. Neil, and B. Davy were supported by RSNZ Marsden Fund grant UOA1022. R. Coffin was supported by a DOE-NETL contract to NRL subcontract to TAMUCC (#601970).",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
day = "29",
doi = "10.1029/2018PA003498",
language = "English",
volume = "Early View",
journal = "Paleoceanography",
issn = "0883-8305",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchange across the last deglaciation from the boron isotope proxy

AU - Shao, Jun

AU - Stott, Lowell D.

AU - Gray, William R.

AU - Greenop, Rosanna

AU - Pecher, Ingo

AU - Neil, Helen L.

AU - Coffin, Richard B.

AU - Davy, Bryan

AU - Rae, James W. B.

N1 - J. Shao and L.D. Stott were supported by an NSF grant (MG&G 1558990). W. R. Gray and R. Greenop were supported by NERC grants NE/N011716/1 and NE/N011716/1 to J.W.B. Rae. I. Pecher, H.L. Neil, and B. Davy were supported by RSNZ Marsden Fund grant UOA1022. R. Coffin was supported by a DOE-NETL contract to NRL subcontract to TAMUCC (#601970).

PY - 2019/10/29

Y1 - 2019/10/29

N2 - Identifying processes within the Earth System that have modulated atmospheric pCO2 during each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene stands as one of the grand challenges in climate science. The growing array of surface ocean pH estimates from the boron isotope proxy across the last glacial termination may reveal regions of the ocean that influenced the timing and magnitude of pCO2 rise. Here we present two new boron isotope records from the subtropical‐subpolar transition zone of the Southwest Pacific that span the last 20 kyr, as well as new radiocarbon data from the same cores. The new data suggest this region was a source of carbon to the atmosphere rather than a moderate sink as it is today. Significantly higher outgassing is observed between ~16.5‐14 kyrBP, associated with increasing δ13C and [CO3]2‐ at depth, suggesting loss of carbon from the intermediate ocean to the atmosphere. We use these new boron isotope records together with existing records to build a composite pH/pCO2 curve for the surface oceans. pH disequilibrium/CO2 outgassing was widespread throughout the last deglaciation, likely explained by upwelling of CO2 from the deep/intermediate ocean. During the Holocene, a smaller outgassing peak is observed at a time of relatively stable atmospheric CO2, which may be explained by regrowth of the terrestrial biosphere countering ocean CO2 release. Our stack is likely biased toward upwelling/CO2 source regions. Nevertheless, the composite pCO2 curve provides robust evidence that various parts of the ocean were releasing CO2 to the atmosphere over the last 25 kyr.

AB - Identifying processes within the Earth System that have modulated atmospheric pCO2 during each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene stands as one of the grand challenges in climate science. The growing array of surface ocean pH estimates from the boron isotope proxy across the last glacial termination may reveal regions of the ocean that influenced the timing and magnitude of pCO2 rise. Here we present two new boron isotope records from the subtropical‐subpolar transition zone of the Southwest Pacific that span the last 20 kyr, as well as new radiocarbon data from the same cores. The new data suggest this region was a source of carbon to the atmosphere rather than a moderate sink as it is today. Significantly higher outgassing is observed between ~16.5‐14 kyrBP, associated with increasing δ13C and [CO3]2‐ at depth, suggesting loss of carbon from the intermediate ocean to the atmosphere. We use these new boron isotope records together with existing records to build a composite pH/pCO2 curve for the surface oceans. pH disequilibrium/CO2 outgassing was widespread throughout the last deglaciation, likely explained by upwelling of CO2 from the deep/intermediate ocean. During the Holocene, a smaller outgassing peak is observed at a time of relatively stable atmospheric CO2, which may be explained by regrowth of the terrestrial biosphere countering ocean CO2 release. Our stack is likely biased toward upwelling/CO2 source regions. Nevertheless, the composite pCO2 curve provides robust evidence that various parts of the ocean were releasing CO2 to the atmosphere over the last 25 kyr.

U2 - 10.1029/2018PA003498

DO - 10.1029/2018PA003498

M3 - Article

VL - Early View

JO - Paleoceanography

JF - Paleoceanography

SN - 0883-8305

ER -

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