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Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals

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Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals. / Twiss, S D ; Wright, N C ; Dunstone, N ; Redman, P ; Moss, S ; Pomeroy, P P .

In: Marine Mammal Science, Vol. 18, No. 2, 04.2002, p. 455-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Twiss, SD, Wright, NC, Dunstone, N, Redman, P, Moss, S & Pomeroy, PP 2002, 'Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals' Marine Mammal Science, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 455-468. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x

APA

Twiss, S. D., Wright, N. C., Dunstone, N., Redman, P., Moss, S., & Pomeroy, P. P. (2002). Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals. Marine Mammal Science, 18(2), 455-468. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x

Vancouver

Twiss SD, Wright NC, Dunstone N, Redman P, Moss S, Pomeroy PP. Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals. Marine Mammal Science. 2002 Apr;18(2):455-468. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x

Author

Twiss, S D ; Wright, N C ; Dunstone, N ; Redman, P ; Moss, S ; Pomeroy, P P . / Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals. In: Marine Mammal Science. 2002 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 455-468.

Bibtex - Download

@article{69d486c321ed40dd9ceb261a962cf080,
title = "Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals",
abstract = "Gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the UK exhibit clear preferences for pupping close to pools of water on inland breeding sites. The reasons for this are unclear as seals are thought to derive all their water requirements from the metabolism of fat. Likewise, the prospect of seals overheating during the UK's cool, damp, autumnal breeding seasons, has seemed unlikely, but has not been previously explored. Here, we provide preliminary behavioral evidence of thermal stress in female gray seals breeding on the island of North Rona, Scotland. Video footage provided measures of proximity to, and the proportion of animals bathing in, pools in relation to meteorological data (temperature, mean sea-level pressure, rainfall, wind speed and direction) on four dates spread through a single breeding season. The proportion of females close to pools increased with pressure (warmer, drier conditions) and decreased on wetter days. In addition, analyses of colony-wide patterns of seal dispersion showed that females tended to be closer to pools of water at higher pressures and temperatures and at lower wind-speeds. These results provide the first evidence of thermal stress and behavioral thermoregulation through access to pools of water in a phocid breeding in temperate autumnal conditions.",
keywords = "Gray seal, Halichoerus grypus, Behavioral thermoregulation, Breeding habitat, North Rona",
author = "Twiss, {S D} and Wright, {N C} and N Dunstone and P Redman and S Moss and Pomeroy, {P P}",
year = "2002",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "455--468",
journal = "Marine Mammal Science",
issn = "0824-0469",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111)",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behavioral evidence of thermal stress from overheating in UK breeding gray seals

AU - Twiss, S D

AU - Wright, N C

AU - Dunstone, N

AU - Redman, P

AU - Moss, S

AU - Pomeroy, P P

PY - 2002/4

Y1 - 2002/4

N2 - Gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the UK exhibit clear preferences for pupping close to pools of water on inland breeding sites. The reasons for this are unclear as seals are thought to derive all their water requirements from the metabolism of fat. Likewise, the prospect of seals overheating during the UK's cool, damp, autumnal breeding seasons, has seemed unlikely, but has not been previously explored. Here, we provide preliminary behavioral evidence of thermal stress in female gray seals breeding on the island of North Rona, Scotland. Video footage provided measures of proximity to, and the proportion of animals bathing in, pools in relation to meteorological data (temperature, mean sea-level pressure, rainfall, wind speed and direction) on four dates spread through a single breeding season. The proportion of females close to pools increased with pressure (warmer, drier conditions) and decreased on wetter days. In addition, analyses of colony-wide patterns of seal dispersion showed that females tended to be closer to pools of water at higher pressures and temperatures and at lower wind-speeds. These results provide the first evidence of thermal stress and behavioral thermoregulation through access to pools of water in a phocid breeding in temperate autumnal conditions.

AB - Gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the UK exhibit clear preferences for pupping close to pools of water on inland breeding sites. The reasons for this are unclear as seals are thought to derive all their water requirements from the metabolism of fat. Likewise, the prospect of seals overheating during the UK's cool, damp, autumnal breeding seasons, has seemed unlikely, but has not been previously explored. Here, we provide preliminary behavioral evidence of thermal stress in female gray seals breeding on the island of North Rona, Scotland. Video footage provided measures of proximity to, and the proportion of animals bathing in, pools in relation to meteorological data (temperature, mean sea-level pressure, rainfall, wind speed and direction) on four dates spread through a single breeding season. The proportion of females close to pools increased with pressure (warmer, drier conditions) and decreased on wetter days. In addition, analyses of colony-wide patterns of seal dispersion showed that females tended to be closer to pools of water at higher pressures and temperatures and at lower wind-speeds. These results provide the first evidence of thermal stress and behavioral thermoregulation through access to pools of water in a phocid breeding in temperate autumnal conditions.

KW - Gray seal

KW - Halichoerus grypus

KW - Behavioral thermoregulation

KW - Breeding habitat

KW - North Rona

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036235428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2002.tb01048.x

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 455

EP - 468

JO - Marine Mammal Science

T2 - Marine Mammal Science

JF - Marine Mammal Science

SN - 0824-0469

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 778961