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Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats

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Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats. / Vernes, Sonja C; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, Vol. 375, No. 1789, 20190061, 06.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Harvard

Vernes, SC & Wilkinson, GS 2020, 'Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats', Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, vol. 375, no. 1789, 20190061. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2019.0061

APA

Vernes, S. C., & Wilkinson, G. S. (2020). Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, 375(1789), [20190061]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2019.0061

Vancouver

Vernes SC, Wilkinson GS. Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences. 2020 Jan 6;375(1789). 20190061. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2019.0061

Author

Vernes, Sonja C ; Wilkinson, Gerald S. / Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats. In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences. 2020 ; Vol. 375, No. 1789.

Bibtex - Download

@article{00d83a7fd726466eadcf903411a493b5,
title = "Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats",
abstract = "The comparative approach can provide insight into the evolution of human speech, language and social communication by studying relevant traits in animal systems. Bats are emerging as a model system with great potential to shed light on these processes given their learned vocalizations, close social interactions, and mammalian brains and physiology. A recent framework outlined the multiple levels of investigation needed to understand vocal learning across a broad range of non-human species, including cetaceans, pinnipeds, elephants, birds and bats. Here, we apply this framework to the current state-of-the-art in bat research. This encompasses our understanding of the abilities bats have displayed for vocal learning, what is known about the timing and social structure needed for such learning, and current knowledge about the prevalence of the trait across the order. It also addresses the biology (vocal tract morphology, neurobiology and genetics) and evolution of this trait. We conclude by highlighting some key questions that should be answered to advance our understanding of the biological encoding and evolution of speech and spoken communication. This article is part of the theme issue 'What can animal communication teach us about human language?'",
keywords = "Animal Communication, Animals, Birds/physiology, Brain, Chiroptera/physiology, Comprehension, Humans, Language, Learning/physiology, Speech/physiology, Vocalization, Animal/physiology",
author = "Vernes, {Sonja C} and Wilkinson, {Gerald S}",
note = "Funding: S.C.V. was funded by a Max Planck Research Group Award and a Human Frontiers Science Program (HFSP) Research grant (grant no. RGP0058/2016).",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1098/rstb.2019.0061",
language = "English",
volume = "375",
journal = "Philosophical Transactions - Royal Society of London, B",
issn = "0962-8436",
publisher = "The Royal Society",
number = "1789",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behaviour, biology and evolution of vocal learning in bats

AU - Vernes, Sonja C

AU - Wilkinson, Gerald S

N1 - Funding: S.C.V. was funded by a Max Planck Research Group Award and a Human Frontiers Science Program (HFSP) Research grant (grant no. RGP0058/2016).

PY - 2020/1/6

Y1 - 2020/1/6

N2 - The comparative approach can provide insight into the evolution of human speech, language and social communication by studying relevant traits in animal systems. Bats are emerging as a model system with great potential to shed light on these processes given their learned vocalizations, close social interactions, and mammalian brains and physiology. A recent framework outlined the multiple levels of investigation needed to understand vocal learning across a broad range of non-human species, including cetaceans, pinnipeds, elephants, birds and bats. Here, we apply this framework to the current state-of-the-art in bat research. This encompasses our understanding of the abilities bats have displayed for vocal learning, what is known about the timing and social structure needed for such learning, and current knowledge about the prevalence of the trait across the order. It also addresses the biology (vocal tract morphology, neurobiology and genetics) and evolution of this trait. We conclude by highlighting some key questions that should be answered to advance our understanding of the biological encoding and evolution of speech and spoken communication. This article is part of the theme issue 'What can animal communication teach us about human language?'

AB - The comparative approach can provide insight into the evolution of human speech, language and social communication by studying relevant traits in animal systems. Bats are emerging as a model system with great potential to shed light on these processes given their learned vocalizations, close social interactions, and mammalian brains and physiology. A recent framework outlined the multiple levels of investigation needed to understand vocal learning across a broad range of non-human species, including cetaceans, pinnipeds, elephants, birds and bats. Here, we apply this framework to the current state-of-the-art in bat research. This encompasses our understanding of the abilities bats have displayed for vocal learning, what is known about the timing and social structure needed for such learning, and current knowledge about the prevalence of the trait across the order. It also addresses the biology (vocal tract morphology, neurobiology and genetics) and evolution of this trait. We conclude by highlighting some key questions that should be answered to advance our understanding of the biological encoding and evolution of speech and spoken communication. This article is part of the theme issue 'What can animal communication teach us about human language?'

KW - Animal Communication

KW - Animals

KW - Birds/physiology

KW - Brain

KW - Chiroptera/physiology

KW - Comprehension

KW - Humans

KW - Language

KW - Learning/physiology

KW - Speech/physiology

KW - Vocalization, Animal/physiology

UR - https://doi.org/10.1101/646703

U2 - 10.1098/rstb.2019.0061

DO - 10.1098/rstb.2019.0061

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31735153

VL - 375

JO - Philosophical Transactions - Royal Society of London, B

JF - Philosophical Transactions - Royal Society of London, B

SN - 0962-8436

IS - 1789

M1 - 20190061

ER -

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