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Bonobos and chimpanzees preferentially attend to familiar members of the dominant sex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Laura S. Lewis, Fumihiro Kano, Jeroen M.G. Stevens, Jamie G. DuBois, Josep Call, Christopher Krupenye

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Abstract

Social animals must carefully track consequential events and opportunities for social learning. However, the competing demands of the social world produce trade-offs in social attention, defined as directed visual attention towards conspecifics. A key question is how socioecology shapes these biases in social attention over evolution and development. Chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and bonobos, Pan paniscus, provide ideal models for addressing this question because they have large communities with fission–fusion grouping, divergent sex-based dominance hierarchies and occasional intergroup encounters. Using noninvasive eye-tracking measures, we recorded captive apes’ attention to side-by-side images of familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics of the same sex. We tested four competing hypotheses about the influence of taxonomically widespread socioecological pressures on social attention, including intergroup conflict, dominance, dispersal and mating competition. Both species preferentially attended to familiar over unfamiliar conspecifics when viewing the sex that typically occupies the highest ranks in the group: females for bonobos, and males for chimpanzees. However, they did not demonstrate attentional biases between familiar and unfamiliar members of the subordinate sex. Findings were consistent across species despite differences in which sex tends to be more dominant. These results suggest that sex-based dominance patterns guide social attention across Pan. Our findings reveal how socioecological pressures shape social attention in apes and likely contribute to the evolution of social cognition across primates.
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-206
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume177
Early online date5 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

    Research areas

  • Dominance, Eye tracking, Familiarity, Great apes, Prefernetial looking, Social attention

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