Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Bottlenose dolphins increase breathing synchrony in response to boat traffic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

G D Hastie, B Wilson, L H Tufft, P M Thompson

School/Research organisations

Abstract

To minimize potential impacts of boat traffic on the behavior of cetaceans it is important to assess short-term behavioral responses to boats and interpret the long-term consequences of these. Anecdotal descriptions of synchronous behavior in cetaceans are particularly frequent with reports of individuals within schools surfacing to breathe in a coordinated fashion being common. However, quantitative descriptions are rare. This study begins by quantifying synchronous breathing patterns of bottlenose dolphins off northern Scotland. We investigate possible functions of synchrony such as feeding patterns and presence of calves. We then test whether the presence of boat traffic in an area used intensively by dolphins affects their breathing synchrony. Although the majority of dolphin schools observed showed random breathing patterns, 30.5 % of schools showed synchronous breathing. There was no variation in this behavior with respect to identifiable feeding activities. However, synchrony was significantly negatively related to the presence of calves in the school (chi(2) = 7.17, df = 1, P = 0.007) and significantly positively related to the presence of boat traffic in the study area (chi(2) = 13.85, df = 1, P = 0.0002). Such consistent short-term behavioral responses by dolphins may potentially accumulate to produce longer-term consequences both for individuals and the whole population.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-84
Number of pages11
JournalMarine Mammal Science
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Effects of impulsive noise on marine mammals: investigating range-dependent risk

    Hastie, G., Merchant, N., Goetz, T., Russell, D. J. F., Thompson, P. & Janik, V. M., 12 Jun 2019, In : Ecological Applications. Early View, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Empirical determination of severe trauma in seals from collisions with tidal turbine blades

    Onoufriou, J., Brownlow, A., Moss, S., Hastie, G. & Thompson, D., 14 May 2019, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. Early View, 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Harbour seals avoid tidal turbine noise: implications for collision risk

    Hastie, G. D., Russell, D. J. F., Lepper, P., Elliott, J., Wilson, B., Benjamins, S. & Thompson, D., Mar 2018, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 55, 2, p. 684-693 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Seals and shipping: quantifying population risk and individual exposure to vessel noise

    Jones, E. L., Hastie, G. D., Smout, S., Onoufriou, J., Merchant, N. D., Brookes, K. L. & Thompson, D., Dec 2017, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 54, 6, p. 1930-1940

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Marine Mammal Science (Journal)

    Gordon Drummond Hastie (Member of editorial board)
    20 Dec 2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Marine Mammal Science (Journal)

    Sophie Caroline Smout (Reviewer)
    1 Dec 201730 Dec 2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Marine Mammal Science (Journal)

    Nora Nell Hanson (Member of editorial board)
    2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  4. Marine Mammal Science (Journal)

    Sophie Caroline Smout (Reviewer)
    Jul 2016 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  5. Marine Mammal Science (Journal)

    Monica Arso Civil (Reviewer)
    20142018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based method for assessing the hydrodynamic impact of animal borne data loggers on host marine mammals

    Kyte, A., Pass, C., Pemberton, R., Sharman, M. & McKnight, J. C., Apr 2019, In : Marine Mammal Science. 35, 2, p. 364-394

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Accuracy and precision of dolphin group size estimates

    Gerrodette, T., Perryman, W. L. & Oedekoven, C. S., Jan 2019, In : Marine Mammal Science. 35, 1, p. 22-39 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Behavioral responses of satellite tracked Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) to mid-frequency active sonar

    Joyce, T. W., Durban, J. W., Claridge, D. E., Dunn, C. A., Hickmott, L. S., Fearnbach, H., Dolan, K. & Moretti, D., 17 Jun 2019, In : Marine Mammal Science. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) reactions to pingers

    Kindt-Larsen, L., Willestofte Berg, C., Northridge, S. P. & Larsen, F., Apr 2019, In : Marine Mammal Science. 35, 2, p. 552-573

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Breathing synchrony in franciscana (Pontoporia blainvillei) and Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) in Southern Brazil

    Actis, P. S., Danilewicz, D., Cremer, M. J. & Bortolotto, G. A., Jul 2018, In : Marine Mammal Science. 34, 3, p. 777-789

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 35077894