Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Can behaviour impede evolution? Persistence of singing effort after morphological song loss in crickets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Evolutionary loss of sexual signals is widespread. Examining the consequences for behaviours associated with such signals can provide insight into factors promoting or inhibiting trait loss. We tested whether a behavioural component of a sexual trait, male calling effort, has been evolutionary reduced in silent populations of Hawaiian field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus). Cricket song requires energetically costly wing movements, but ‘flatwing’ males have feminized wings that preclude song and protect against a lethal, eavesdropping parasitoid. Flatwing males express wing movement patterns associated with singing but, in contrast with normal-wing males, sustained periods of wing movement cannot confer sexual selection benefits and should be subject to strong negative selection. We developed an automated technique to quantify how long males spend expressing wing movements associated with song. We compared calling effort among populations of Hawaiian crickets with differing proportions of silent males and between male morphs. Contrary to expectation, silent populations invested as much in calling effort as non-silent populations. Additionally, flatwing and normal-wing males from the same population did not differ in calling effort. The lack of evolved behavioural adjustment following morphological change in silent Hawaiian crickets illustrates how behaviour might sometimes impede, rather than facilitate, evolution.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number20190931
Number of pages5
JournalBiology Letters
Volume16
Issue number6
Early online date17 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

    Research areas

  • Vestigial trait, Adaptation, Teleogryllus oceanicus, Trait loss, Behavioural flexibility

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets

    Zhang, X., Rayner, J. G., Blaxter, M. & Bailey, N. W., 4 Jan 2021, In: Nature Communications. 12, 15 p., 50.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Field cricket genome reveals the footprint of recent, abrupt adaptation in the wild

    Pascoal, S., Risse, J. E., Zhang, X., Blaxter, M., Cezard, T., Challis, R. J., Gharbi, K., Hunt, J., Kumar, S., Langan, E., Liu, X., Rayner, J. G., Ritchie, M. G., Snoek, B. L., Trivedi, U. & Bailey, N. W., 7 Feb 2020, In: Evolution Letters. 4, 1, p. 19-33 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Testing the role of same-sex sexual behaviour in the evolution of alternative male reproductive phenotypes

    Rayner, J. & Bailey, N. W., Nov 2019, In: Animal Behaviour. 157, p. 5-11

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. A silent orchestra: convergent song loss in Hawaiian crickets is repeated, morphologically varied, and widespread

    Rayner, J., Aldridge, S., Montealegre-Z, F. & Bailey, N. W., Aug 2019, In: Ecology. 100, 8, 4 p., e02694.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Release from intralocus sexual conflict? Evolved loss of a male sexual trait demasculinizes female gene expression

    Rayner, J., Pascoal, S. C. M. & Bailey, N. W., 17 Apr 2019, In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1901, 8 p., 20190497.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Graeme Douglas Ruxton (Editor)

    2012 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Karen Anne Spencer (Member of editorial board)

    1 Apr 2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  3. Biology Letters (Journal)

    David Michael Shuker (Member of editorial board)

    2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Josep Call (Member of editorial board)

    20072013

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Richard William Byrne (Member of editorial board)

    20072012

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Chimpanzee lip-smacks confirm primate continuity for speech-rhythm evolution

    Pereira, A. S., Kavanagh, E., Hobaiter, C., Slocombe, K. E. & R. Lameira, A., 27 May 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 5, 20200232.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Does kin discrimination promote cooperation?

    Faria, G. & Gardner, A., Mar 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 3, 4 p., 20190742.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Examining the mechanisms underlying the acquisition of animal tool behaviour

    Bandini, E., Motes-Rodrigo, A., Steele, M. P., Rutz, C. & Tennie, C., 24 Jun 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 6, 6 p., 20200122.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Partitioning colony size variation into growth and partial mortality

    Madin, J. S., Baird, A. H., Baskett, M. L., Connolly, S. R. & Dornelas, M. A., 22 Jan 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 1, 2019.0727.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 268552974

Top