Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Cetacean vocal learning and communication

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cetaceans are one of the few mammalian clades capable of vocal production learning. Evidence for this comes from synchronous changes in song patterns of baleen whales and experimental work on toothed whales in captivity. While baleen
whales like many vocal learners use this skill in song displays that are involved in sexual selection, toothed whales use learned signals in individual recognition and the negotiation of social relationships. Experimental studies demonstrated that
dolphins can use learned signals referentially. Studies on wild dolphins demonstrated how this skill appears to be useful in their own communication system, making them an interesting subject for comparative communication studies.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-65
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Effects of impulsive noise on marine mammals: investigating range-dependent risk

    Hastie, G., Merchant, N., Goetz, T., Russell, D. J. F., Thompson, P. & Janik, V. M., Jul 2019, In : Ecological Applications. 29, 5, 10 p., e01906.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Formant modification through vocal production learning in gray seals

    Stansbury, A. & Janik, V. M., 20 Jun 2019, In : Current Biology. 29, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Variations in age- and sex-specific survival rates help explain population trend in a discrete marine mammal population

    Arso Civil, M., Cheney, B., Quick, N. J., Islas-Villanueva, V., Graves, J. A., Janik, V. M., Thompson, P. M. & Hammond, P. S., Jan 2019, In : Ecology and Evolution. 9, 1, p. 533-544 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Individual Signatures in Animal Groups: Cetaceans

    Sayigh, L. S. & Janik, V. M., 2019, Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior. Choe, J. C. (ed.). 2nd ed. Oxford, Vol. 1. p. 539-549

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  5. Clicks of dwarf sperm whales (Kogia sima)

    Merkens, K., Mann, D., Janik, V. M., Claridge, D., Hill, M. & Oleson, E., 24 Oct 2018, In : Marine Mammal Science. 34, 4, p. 963-978

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Experimental field studies with non-human primates

    Zuberbuehler, K., Oct 2014, In : Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 28, p. 150-156 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Neuromodulation in developing motor microcircuits

    Sillar, K. T., Combes, D. & Simmers, J., Dec 2014, In : Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 29, p. 73-81

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Learning and cognitive flexibility: frontostriatal function and monoaminergic modulation

    Kehagia, A. A., Murray, G. K. & Robbins, T. W., Apr 2010, In : Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 20, 2, p. 199-204 6 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 119778403

Top