Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Changing distribution of the east coast of Scotland bottlenose dolphin population and the challenges of area-based management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Open Access Status

  • Embargoed (until 6/09/20)

Abstract

1. The efficacy of marine protected areas (MPAs) depends on clear conservation objectives and ecologically meaningful boundaries. The east coast of Scotland bottlenose dolphin population expanded its distributional range during the 1990s beyond the boundaries of the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation (SAC), originally proposed to contain their core area of distribution. Two decades on, this study assesses the importance for this population of St Andrews Bay and the Tay estuary, 300 km south of the SAC.
2. Photoidentification data from 2009 to 2015 were analysed using mark–recapture models to investigate the proportion of the population that uses St Andrews Bay and the Tay estuary. Habitat models were fitted to bottlenose dolphin presence–absence data to identify areas of high use.
3.The estimated number of dolphins using St Andrews Bay and the Tay estuary during the summer increased from 91 (95% confidence interval 78–106) in 2009 to 114 (95% confidence interval 95–137) in 2015, representing, on average, 52.5% of the total estimated east‐coast population for that period. Spatial mixing of individuals during the summer between St Andrews Bay and the Tay estuary and the Moray Firth SAC was estimated to be a minimum of ~6% per year and ~30% over the study period. The entrance to the Firth of Tay and waters around Montrose were identified as areas of consistent high use.
4. The importance of St Andrews Bay and the Tay estuary reconfirms that effective monitoring of the population requires dedicated effort in both this area and the SAC. The results lead to consideration of the wider context of area‐based management for the conservation/management of highly mobile wide‐ranging species and human activities that might impact them.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-196
Number of pages19
JournalAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems
Volume29
Issue numberS1
Early online date6 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Sep 2019

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Variations in age- and sex-specific survival rates help explain population trend in a discrete marine mammal population

    Arso Civil, M., Cheney, B., Quick, N. J., Islas-Villanueva, V., Graves, J. A., Janik, V. M., Thompson, P. M. & Hammond, P. S., Jan 2019, In : Ecology and Evolution. 9, 1, p. 533-544 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. A new approach to estimate fecundity rate from inter-birth intervals

    Arso Civil, M., Cheney, B., Quick, N. J., Thompson, P. M. & Hammond, P. S., Apr 2017, In : Ecosphere. 8, 4, 10 p., e01796.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Strategic Regional Pre-construction Marine Mammal Monitoring Programme Annual Report 2016

    Graham, I. M., Cheney, B., Hewitt, R., Cordes, L., Hastie, G. D., Russell, D. J. F., Arso Civil, M., Hammond, P. S. & Thompson, P., 2016, University of Aberdeen. 58 p. (Annual report for the Moray Firth Regional Advisory Group)

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

  4. Predicting the effects of human developments on individual dolphins to understand potential long-term population consequences

    Pirotta, E., Harwood, J., Thompson, P., New, L., Cheney, B., Arso Civil, M., Hammond, P. S., Donovan, C. R. & Lusseau, D., Nov 2015, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 282, 1818, 9 p., 20152109.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. The east coast of Scotland bottlenose dolphin population: improving understanding of ecology outside the Moray Firth SAC

    Quick, N. J., Arso Civil, M., Cheney, B., Islas Villanueva, V., Janik, V., Thompson, P. & Hammond, P. S., 7 May 2014, Department of Energy and Climate Change. 87 p. (OESEA2 Supporting documents; no. 14D/086)

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Related by journal

  1. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems (Journal)

    Monica Arso Civil (Reviewer)
    Jul 2018 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Age–length relationships in UK harbour seals during a period of population decline

    Hall, A. J., Mackey, B., Kershaw, J. L. & Thompson, P., 6 Sep 2019, In : Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. 29, S1, p. 61-70 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Assessing cetacean body condition: is total lipid content in blubber biopsies a useful monitoring tool?

    Kershaw, J. L., Brownlow, A., Ramp, C. A., Miller, P. J. O. & Hall, A. J., 6 Sep 2019, In : Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. 29, S1, p. 271-282 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Automated detection and tracking of marine mammals: a novel sonar tool for monitoring effects of marine industry

    Hastie, G. D., Wu, G-M., Moss, S., Jepp, P., MacAulay, J. D. J., Lee, A., Sparling, C. E., Evers, C. H. M. & Gillespie, D. M., 6 Sep 2019, In : Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. 29, S1, p. 119-130

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 255391852

Top