Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Standard

'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity. / Humfress, Caroline.

The church and the law. ed. / Rosamond McKitterick; Charlott Methuen; Andrew Spicer. Vol. 56 Cambridge University Press, 2020. p. 36-59 (Studies in Church History).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Humfress, C 2020, 'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity. in R McKitterick, C Methuen & A Spicer (eds), The church and the law. vol. 56, Studies in Church History, Cambridge University Press, pp. 36-59. https://doi.org/10.1017/stc.2019.3

APA

Humfress, C. (2020). 'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity. In R. McKitterick, C. Methuen, & A. Spicer (Eds.), The church and the law (Vol. 56, pp. 36-59). (Studies in Church History). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/stc.2019.3

Vancouver

Humfress C. 'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity. In McKitterick R, Methuen C, Spicer A, editors, The church and the law. Vol. 56. Cambridge University Press. 2020. p. 36-59. (Studies in Church History). https://doi.org/10.1017/stc.2019.3

Author

Humfress, Caroline. / 'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity. The church and the law. editor / Rosamond McKitterick ; Charlott Methuen ; Andrew Spicer. Vol. 56 Cambridge University Press, 2020. pp. 36-59 (Studies in Church History).

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{bdc4c2987ea347b89ade1cf6e6ce9fbe,
title = "'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity",
abstract = "In contrast with contemporary heresiological discourse, the Codex Theodosianus, a Roman imperial law code promulgated in 438, makes no systematic gendered references to heretics or heresy. According to late Roman legislative rhetoric, heretics are demented, polluted and infected with pestilence, but they are not seductive temptresses, vulgar {\textquoteleft}women{\textquoteright} or weak-minded whores. This article explores the gap between the precisely marked terrain of Christian heresiologists and (Christian) legislators. The first part gives a brief overview of early Christian heresiology. The second explores late Roman legislation and the construction of the heretic as a {\textquoteleft}legal subject{\textquoteright} in the Codex Theodosianus. The third turns to the celebrated account crafted by Pope Leo I of anti-Manichaean trials at Rome in 443/4, arguing that they should be understood as part of a much broader developing regime of ecclesial power, rather than as concrete applications of existing imperial anti-heresy laws.",
author = "Caroline Humfress",
year = "2020",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1017/stc.2019.3",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781108839631",
volume = "56",
series = "Studies in Church History",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
pages = "36--59",
editor = "Rosamond McKitterick and Charlott Methuen and Andrew Spicer",
booktitle = "The church and the law",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - 'Cherchez la femme!' Heresy and law in late antiquity

AU - Humfress, Caroline

PY - 2020/6

Y1 - 2020/6

N2 - In contrast with contemporary heresiological discourse, the Codex Theodosianus, a Roman imperial law code promulgated in 438, makes no systematic gendered references to heretics or heresy. According to late Roman legislative rhetoric, heretics are demented, polluted and infected with pestilence, but they are not seductive temptresses, vulgar ‘women’ or weak-minded whores. This article explores the gap between the precisely marked terrain of Christian heresiologists and (Christian) legislators. The first part gives a brief overview of early Christian heresiology. The second explores late Roman legislation and the construction of the heretic as a ‘legal subject’ in the Codex Theodosianus. The third turns to the celebrated account crafted by Pope Leo I of anti-Manichaean trials at Rome in 443/4, arguing that they should be understood as part of a much broader developing regime of ecclesial power, rather than as concrete applications of existing imperial anti-heresy laws.

AB - In contrast with contemporary heresiological discourse, the Codex Theodosianus, a Roman imperial law code promulgated in 438, makes no systematic gendered references to heretics or heresy. According to late Roman legislative rhetoric, heretics are demented, polluted and infected with pestilence, but they are not seductive temptresses, vulgar ‘women’ or weak-minded whores. This article explores the gap between the precisely marked terrain of Christian heresiologists and (Christian) legislators. The first part gives a brief overview of early Christian heresiology. The second explores late Roman legislation and the construction of the heretic as a ‘legal subject’ in the Codex Theodosianus. The third turns to the celebrated account crafted by Pope Leo I of anti-Manichaean trials at Rome in 443/4, arguing that they should be understood as part of a much broader developing regime of ecclesial power, rather than as concrete applications of existing imperial anti-heresy laws.

U2 - 10.1017/stc.2019.3

DO - 10.1017/stc.2019.3

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781108839631

VL - 56

T3 - Studies in Church History

SP - 36

EP - 59

BT - The church and the law

A2 - McKitterick, Rosamond

A2 - Methuen, Charlott

A2 - Spicer, Andrew

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -

Related by author

  1. A new legal cosmos: late Roman lawyers and the early medieval church

    Humfress, C., 9 Feb 2018, The medieval world. Linehan, P., Nelson, J. L. & Costambeys, M. (eds.). 2nd ed. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 21 p. (Routledge worlds).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  2. Gift-giving and inheritance strategies in late Roman law and legal practice

    Humfress, C., 7 Jun 2017, Donations, inheritance and property in the Nordic and Western world from late Antiquity until today. Rønning, O-A., Møller Sigh, H. & Vogt, H. (eds.). Routledge, Vol. Abingdon. 19 p. (Routledge studies in cultural history).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  3. Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

    Humphries, M., Nicholson O., and team of 'subject editors', 2017, Oxford University Press.

    Research output: Other contribution

  4. Ordering divine knowledge in late Roman legal discourse

    Humfress, C., 1 Apr 2016, In: COLLeGIUM. 20, p. 160-176

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Telling stories about (Roman) law: rules and concepts in legal discourse

    Humfress, C., 12 Nov 2015, Legalism: Rules and Categories. Dresch, P. & Scheele, J. (eds.). Oxford: Oxford University Press, p. 79-104

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

ID: 257702850

Top