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Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use

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Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use. / Watson, Stuart K.; Vale, Gillian L.; Hopper, Lydia M.; Dean, Lewis G.; Kendal, Rachel L.; Price, Elizabeth E.; Wood, Lara A.; Davis, Sarah J.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Whiten, Andrew.

In: Animal Cognition, Vol. In press, 19.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Watson, SK, Vale, GL, Hopper, LM, Dean, LG, Kendal, RL, Price, EE, Wood, LA, Davis, SJ, Schapiro, SJ, Lambeth, SP & Whiten, A 2018, 'Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use', Animal Cognition, vol. In press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7

APA

Watson, S. K., Vale, G. L., Hopper, L. M., Dean, L. G., Kendal, R. L., Price, E. E., ... Whiten, A. (2018). Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use. Animal Cognition, In press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7

Vancouver

Watson SK, Vale GL, Hopper LM, Dean LG, Kendal RL, Price EE et al. Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use. Animal Cognition. 2018 Jun 19;In press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7

Author

Watson, Stuart K. ; Vale, Gillian L. ; Hopper, Lydia M. ; Dean, Lewis G. ; Kendal, Rachel L. ; Price, Elizabeth E. ; Wood, Lara A. ; Davis, Sarah J. ; Schapiro, Steven J. ; Lambeth, Susan P. ; Whiten, Andrew. / Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use. In: Animal Cognition. 2018 ; Vol. In press.

Bibtex - Download

@article{afa54a6bd52343079ef2dc8794dac433,
title = "Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use",
abstract = "Studies of transmission biases in social learning have greatly informed our understanding of how behaviour patterns may diffuse through animal populations, yet within-species inter-individual variation in social information use has received little attention and remains poorly understood. We have addressed this question by examining individual performances across multiple experiments with the same population of primates. We compiled a data set spanning 16 social learning studies (26 experimental conditions) carried out at the same study site over a 12-year period, incorporating a total of 167 chimpanzees. We applied a binary scoring system to code each participant’s performance in each study according to whether they demonstrated evidence of using social information from conspecifics to solve the experimental task or not (Social Information Score – ‘SIS’). Bayesian binomial mixed effects models were then used to estimate the extent to which individual differences influenced SIS, together with any effects of sex, rearing history, age, prior involvement in research and task type on SIS. An estimate of repeatability found that approximately half of the variance in SIS was accounted for by individual identity, indicating that individual differences play a critical role in the social learning behaviour of chimpanzees. According to the model that best fit the data, females were, depending on their rearing history, 15-24{\%} more likely to use social information to solve experimental tasks than males. However, there was no strong evidence of an effect of age or research experience, and pedigree records indicated that SIS was not a strongly heritable trait. Our study offers a novel, transferable method for the study of individual differences in social learning.",
keywords = "Chimpanzee, Culture, Social learning, Individual differences, Meta-analysis, sex differences",
author = "Watson, {Stuart K.} and Vale, {Gillian L.} and Hopper, {Lydia M.} and Dean, {Lewis G.} and Kendal, {Rachel L.} and Price, {Elizabeth E.} and Wood, {Lara A.} and Davis, {Sarah J.} and Schapiro, {Steven J.} and Lambeth, {Susan P.} and Andrew Whiten",
note = "The National Center for Chimpanzee Care is supported by NIH Cooperative Agreement U42 OD-011197. SKW, GLV, SJD and AW are grateful for the support of the John Templeton Foundation, grant ID40128: ‘Exploring the evolutionary foundations of cultural complexity, creativity and trust’, awarded to AW and Kevin Laland, which partly funded this project. At the time of writing, LH was supported by the Leo S. Guthman Fund. Details of funding for each of the studies which contributed towards the dataset used in the current study can be found in their original publication.",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7",
language = "English",
volume = "In press",
journal = "Animal Cognition",
issn = "1435-9448",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chimpanzees demonstrate individual differences in social information use

AU - Watson, Stuart K.

AU - Vale, Gillian L.

AU - Hopper, Lydia M.

AU - Dean, Lewis G.

AU - Kendal, Rachel L.

AU - Price, Elizabeth E.

AU - Wood, Lara A.

AU - Davis, Sarah J.

AU - Schapiro, Steven J.

AU - Lambeth, Susan P.

AU - Whiten, Andrew

N1 - The National Center for Chimpanzee Care is supported by NIH Cooperative Agreement U42 OD-011197. SKW, GLV, SJD and AW are grateful for the support of the John Templeton Foundation, grant ID40128: ‘Exploring the evolutionary foundations of cultural complexity, creativity and trust’, awarded to AW and Kevin Laland, which partly funded this project. At the time of writing, LH was supported by the Leo S. Guthman Fund. Details of funding for each of the studies which contributed towards the dataset used in the current study can be found in their original publication.

PY - 2018/6/19

Y1 - 2018/6/19

N2 - Studies of transmission biases in social learning have greatly informed our understanding of how behaviour patterns may diffuse through animal populations, yet within-species inter-individual variation in social information use has received little attention and remains poorly understood. We have addressed this question by examining individual performances across multiple experiments with the same population of primates. We compiled a data set spanning 16 social learning studies (26 experimental conditions) carried out at the same study site over a 12-year period, incorporating a total of 167 chimpanzees. We applied a binary scoring system to code each participant’s performance in each study according to whether they demonstrated evidence of using social information from conspecifics to solve the experimental task or not (Social Information Score – ‘SIS’). Bayesian binomial mixed effects models were then used to estimate the extent to which individual differences influenced SIS, together with any effects of sex, rearing history, age, prior involvement in research and task type on SIS. An estimate of repeatability found that approximately half of the variance in SIS was accounted for by individual identity, indicating that individual differences play a critical role in the social learning behaviour of chimpanzees. According to the model that best fit the data, females were, depending on their rearing history, 15-24% more likely to use social information to solve experimental tasks than males. However, there was no strong evidence of an effect of age or research experience, and pedigree records indicated that SIS was not a strongly heritable trait. Our study offers a novel, transferable method for the study of individual differences in social learning.

AB - Studies of transmission biases in social learning have greatly informed our understanding of how behaviour patterns may diffuse through animal populations, yet within-species inter-individual variation in social information use has received little attention and remains poorly understood. We have addressed this question by examining individual performances across multiple experiments with the same population of primates. We compiled a data set spanning 16 social learning studies (26 experimental conditions) carried out at the same study site over a 12-year period, incorporating a total of 167 chimpanzees. We applied a binary scoring system to code each participant’s performance in each study according to whether they demonstrated evidence of using social information from conspecifics to solve the experimental task or not (Social Information Score – ‘SIS’). Bayesian binomial mixed effects models were then used to estimate the extent to which individual differences influenced SIS, together with any effects of sex, rearing history, age, prior involvement in research and task type on SIS. An estimate of repeatability found that approximately half of the variance in SIS was accounted for by individual identity, indicating that individual differences play a critical role in the social learning behaviour of chimpanzees. According to the model that best fit the data, females were, depending on their rearing history, 15-24% more likely to use social information to solve experimental tasks than males. However, there was no strong evidence of an effect of age or research experience, and pedigree records indicated that SIS was not a strongly heritable trait. Our study offers a novel, transferable method for the study of individual differences in social learning.

KW - Chimpanzee

KW - Culture

KW - Social learning

KW - Individual differences

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - sex differences

U2 - 10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7

DO - 10.1007/s10071-018-1198-7

M3 - Article

VL - In press

JO - Animal Cognition

JF - Animal Cognition

SN - 1435-9448

ER -

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