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Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed. / Seed, Amanda M.; Call, Josep; Emery, Nathan J.; Clayton, Nicola S.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 23-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Seed, AM, Call, J, Emery, NJ & Clayton, NS 2009, 'Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed', Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 23-34. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012925

APA

Seed, A. M., Call, J., Emery, N. J., & Clayton, N. S. (2009). Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 35(1), 23-34. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012925

Vancouver

Seed AM, Call J, Emery NJ, Clayton NS. Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. 2009 Jan;35(1):23-34. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012925

Author

Seed, Amanda M. ; Call, Josep ; Emery, Nathan J. ; Clayton, Nicola S. / Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. 2009 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 23-34.

Bibtex - Download

@article{e0505f8c3e7540408a2dadb76fabc8d4,
title = "Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed",
abstract = "The trap-tube problem is difficult for chimpanzees to solve; in several studies only 1 to 2 subjects learn the solution. The authors tested eight chimpanzees on a non-tool-using version of the problem to investigate whether the inclusion of a tool in previous tests of the trap problem may have masked the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. All eight learned to avoid the trap, in 40 to 100 trials. One transferred to two tasks that had no visual cue in common. The authors examined the performance of 15 chimpanzees on a new task in a 2 x 2 design: seven had experience on the two-trap box, eight had not; half of each group was tested with a tool, half without one. An ANOVA revealed a significant effect of tool-inclusion and experience (p < .05). Our results show that including a tool in the trap problem profoundly affects the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. With regard to what the chimpanzees had learned, the results support the notion that rather than using the available stimuli as arbitrary cues, the subjects had encoded information about functional properties.",
keywords = "chimpanzees, cognition, casuality, tool, MONKEYS CEBUS-APELLA, FOLK PHYSICS, TASK, APES, COMPREHENSION, HUMANS",
author = "Seed, {Amanda M.} and Josep Call and Emery, {Nathan J.} and Clayton, {Nicola S.}",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0012925",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "23--34",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes",
issn = "0097-7403",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chimpanzees Solve the Trap Problem When the Confound of Tool-Use is Removed

AU - Seed, Amanda M.

AU - Call, Josep

AU - Emery, Nathan J.

AU - Clayton, Nicola S.

PY - 2009/1

Y1 - 2009/1

N2 - The trap-tube problem is difficult for chimpanzees to solve; in several studies only 1 to 2 subjects learn the solution. The authors tested eight chimpanzees on a non-tool-using version of the problem to investigate whether the inclusion of a tool in previous tests of the trap problem may have masked the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. All eight learned to avoid the trap, in 40 to 100 trials. One transferred to two tasks that had no visual cue in common. The authors examined the performance of 15 chimpanzees on a new task in a 2 x 2 design: seven had experience on the two-trap box, eight had not; half of each group was tested with a tool, half without one. An ANOVA revealed a significant effect of tool-inclusion and experience (p < .05). Our results show that including a tool in the trap problem profoundly affects the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. With regard to what the chimpanzees had learned, the results support the notion that rather than using the available stimuli as arbitrary cues, the subjects had encoded information about functional properties.

AB - The trap-tube problem is difficult for chimpanzees to solve; in several studies only 1 to 2 subjects learn the solution. The authors tested eight chimpanzees on a non-tool-using version of the problem to investigate whether the inclusion of a tool in previous tests of the trap problem may have masked the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. All eight learned to avoid the trap, in 40 to 100 trials. One transferred to two tasks that had no visual cue in common. The authors examined the performance of 15 chimpanzees on a new task in a 2 x 2 design: seven had experience on the two-trap box, eight had not; half of each group was tested with a tool, half without one. An ANOVA revealed a significant effect of tool-inclusion and experience (p < .05). Our results show that including a tool in the trap problem profoundly affects the ability of chimpanzees to solve it. With regard to what the chimpanzees had learned, the results support the notion that rather than using the available stimuli as arbitrary cues, the subjects had encoded information about functional properties.

KW - chimpanzees

KW - cognition

KW - casuality

KW - tool

KW - MONKEYS CEBUS-APELLA

KW - FOLK PHYSICS

KW - TASK

KW - APES

KW - COMPREHENSION

KW - HUMANS

U2 - 10.1037/a0012925

DO - 10.1037/a0012925

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 23

EP - 34

JO - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes

JF - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes

SN - 0097-7403

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 15421605

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