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Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content

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DOI

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Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content. / Osborne, Peter W.; Ferrier, David E. K.

In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 27, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 217-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Harvard

Osborne, PW & Ferrier, DEK 2010, 'Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content' Molecular Biology and Evolution, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 217-220. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msp235

APA

Osborne, P. W., & Ferrier, D. E. K. (2010). Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 27(2), 217-220. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msp235

Vancouver

Osborne PW, Ferrier DEK. Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content. Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2010 Feb;27(2):217-220. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msp235

Author

Osborne, Peter W. ; Ferrier, David E. K. / Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content. In: Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2010 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 217-220.

Bibtex - Download

@article{86b1b8d624c9420784deec8a17787789,
title = "Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content",
abstract = "The ParaHox and Hox gene clusters control aspects of animal anterior-posterior development and are related as paralogous evolutionary sisters. Despite this relationship, it is not clear if the clusters operate in similar ways, with similar constraints. To compare clusters, we examined the transposable-element (TE) content of amphioxus and mammalian ParaHox and Hox clusters. Chordate Hox clusters are known to be largely devoid of TEs, possibly due to gene regulation and constraints on clustering in these animals. Here, we describe several novel amphioxus TEs and show that the amphioxus ParaHox cluster is a hotspot for TE insertion. TE contents of mammalian ParaHox loci are at background levels, in stark contrast to chordate Hox clusters. This marks a significant difference between Hox and ParaHox clusters. The presence of so many potentially disruptive elements implies selection constrains these ParaHox clusters as they have not dispersed despite 500 My of evolution for each lineage.",
keywords = "MITE, ParaHox, repetitive elements, Hox, amphioxus, DEVELOPMENTAL GENES, EVOLUTION, GENOME, SPECIFICATION, TRANSCRIPTION, COMPLEX, BLIMP1, MICE",
author = "Osborne, {Peter W.} and Ferrier, {David E. K.}",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1093/molbev/msp235",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "217--220",
journal = "Molecular Biology and Evolution",
issn = "0737-4038",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chordate Hox and ParaHox Gene Clusters Differ Dramatically in Their Repetitive Element Content

AU - Osborne, Peter W.

AU - Ferrier, David E. K.

PY - 2010/2

Y1 - 2010/2

N2 - The ParaHox and Hox gene clusters control aspects of animal anterior-posterior development and are related as paralogous evolutionary sisters. Despite this relationship, it is not clear if the clusters operate in similar ways, with similar constraints. To compare clusters, we examined the transposable-element (TE) content of amphioxus and mammalian ParaHox and Hox clusters. Chordate Hox clusters are known to be largely devoid of TEs, possibly due to gene regulation and constraints on clustering in these animals. Here, we describe several novel amphioxus TEs and show that the amphioxus ParaHox cluster is a hotspot for TE insertion. TE contents of mammalian ParaHox loci are at background levels, in stark contrast to chordate Hox clusters. This marks a significant difference between Hox and ParaHox clusters. The presence of so many potentially disruptive elements implies selection constrains these ParaHox clusters as they have not dispersed despite 500 My of evolution for each lineage.

AB - The ParaHox and Hox gene clusters control aspects of animal anterior-posterior development and are related as paralogous evolutionary sisters. Despite this relationship, it is not clear if the clusters operate in similar ways, with similar constraints. To compare clusters, we examined the transposable-element (TE) content of amphioxus and mammalian ParaHox and Hox clusters. Chordate Hox clusters are known to be largely devoid of TEs, possibly due to gene regulation and constraints on clustering in these animals. Here, we describe several novel amphioxus TEs and show that the amphioxus ParaHox cluster is a hotspot for TE insertion. TE contents of mammalian ParaHox loci are at background levels, in stark contrast to chordate Hox clusters. This marks a significant difference between Hox and ParaHox clusters. The presence of so many potentially disruptive elements implies selection constrains these ParaHox clusters as they have not dispersed despite 500 My of evolution for each lineage.

KW - MITE

KW - ParaHox

KW - repetitive elements

KW - Hox

KW - amphioxus

KW - DEVELOPMENTAL GENES

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - GENOME

KW - SPECIFICATION

KW - TRANSCRIPTION

KW - COMPLEX

KW - BLIMP1

KW - MICE

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=74549207993&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/molbev/msp235

DO - 10.1093/molbev/msp235

M3 - Letter

VL - 27

SP - 217

EP - 220

JO - Molecular Biology and Evolution

T2 - Molecular Biology and Evolution

JF - Molecular Biology and Evolution

SN - 0737-4038

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 2340077