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Cognitive adaptations of social bonding in birds

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Author(s)

Nathan J. Emery, Amanda M. Seed, Auguste M. P. von Bayern, Nicola S. Clayton

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Abstract

The 'social intelligence hypothesis' was originally conceived to explain how primates may have evolved their superior intellect and large brains when compared with other animals. Although some birds such as corvids may be intellectually comparable to apes, the same relationship between sociality and brain size seen in primates has not been found for birds, possibly suggesting a role for other non-social factors. But bird sociality is different from primate sociality. Most monkeys and apes form stable groups, whereas most birds are monogamous, and only form large flocks outside of the breeding season. Some birds form lifelong pair bonds and these species tend to have the largest brains relative to body size. Some of these species are known for their intellectual abilities (e.g. corvids and parrots), while others are not (e.g. geese and albatrosses). Although socio-ecological factors may explain some of the differences in brain size and intelligence between corvids/parrots and geese/albatrosses, we predict that the type and quality of the bonded relationship is also critical. Indeed, we present empirical evidence that rook and jackdaw partnerships resemble primate and dolphin alliances. Although social interactions within a pair may seem simple on the surface, we argue that cognition may play an important role in the maintenance of long-term relationships, something we name as 'relationship intelligence'.

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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-505
Number of pages17
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences
Volume362
Issue number1480
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2007

    Research areas

  • avian brain, jackdaw, monogamy, pair bonding, rook, social intelligence, JACKDAWS CORVUS-MONEDULA, GEESE ANSER-ANSER, SPECTACLED PARROTLETS, BRAIN SIZE, MELOPSITTACUS-UNDULATUS, FORPUS-CONSPICILLATUS, CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES, FOREBRAIN SIZE, CONTACT CALLS, CARRION CROW

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