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Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises

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Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises. / Elmegaard, Siri; Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Peter; McDonald, Birgitte.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 26, No. 22, 21.11.2016, p. R1175-R1176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Elmegaard, S, Johnson, M, Madsen, P & McDonald, B 2016, 'Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises' Current Biology, vol. 26, no. 22, pp. R1175-R1176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020

APA

Elmegaard, S., Johnson, M., Madsen, P., & McDonald, B. (2016). Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises. Current Biology, 26(22), R1175-R1176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020

Vancouver

Elmegaard S, Johnson M, Madsen P, McDonald B. Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises. Current Biology. 2016 Nov 21;26(22):R1175-R1176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020

Author

Elmegaard, Siri ; Johnson, Mark ; Madsen, Peter ; McDonald, Birgitte. / Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises. In: Current Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 22. pp. R1175-R1176.

Bibtex - Download

@article{4b4e57c4d9ea4db498a772fb33102077,
title = "Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises",
abstract = "Marine mammals have adapted to forage while holding their breath in a suite of aquatic habitats from shallow rivers to deep oceans. The key to tolerate such extensive apnea is the dive response, which comprises bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Although initially considered an all-or-nothing reflex [1] , numerous studies on freely diving marine mammals have revealed substantial dynamics of the dive response to meet the impending dive demands of depth, duration and exercise [2] . Such adjustments are not only autonomic responses, but are under acute cognitive control in pinnipeds [3] living amphibiously on land and in water. The fully aquatic cetaceans would similarly benefit from cognitive cardiovascular control; however, even though they have exercise-modulated diving bradycardia [2] and full voluntary control of their respiratory system to such extent that even mild anesthesia often leads to asphyxiation [4] , cognitive cardiovascular control has never been demonstrated for this large group of marine mammals. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that porpoises modulate bradycardia according to anticipated dive duration. Two harbor porpoises, instrumented with ECG recording tags, were trained to perform 20- and 80-second stationary dives, during which they adjusted bradycardia to the anticipated duration, demonstrating cognitive control of their dive response.",
author = "Siri Elmegaard and Mark Johnson and Peter Madsen and Birgitte McDonald",
note = "M.J. was funded by the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology, Scotland, and by a Marie Curie Career Integration Grant.",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "R1175--R1176",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "22",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive control of heart rate in diving harbor porpoises

AU - Elmegaard, Siri

AU - Johnson, Mark

AU - Madsen, Peter

AU - McDonald, Birgitte

N1 - M.J. was funded by the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology, Scotland, and by a Marie Curie Career Integration Grant.

PY - 2016/11/21

Y1 - 2016/11/21

N2 - Marine mammals have adapted to forage while holding their breath in a suite of aquatic habitats from shallow rivers to deep oceans. The key to tolerate such extensive apnea is the dive response, which comprises bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Although initially considered an all-or-nothing reflex [1] , numerous studies on freely diving marine mammals have revealed substantial dynamics of the dive response to meet the impending dive demands of depth, duration and exercise [2] . Such adjustments are not only autonomic responses, but are under acute cognitive control in pinnipeds [3] living amphibiously on land and in water. The fully aquatic cetaceans would similarly benefit from cognitive cardiovascular control; however, even though they have exercise-modulated diving bradycardia [2] and full voluntary control of their respiratory system to such extent that even mild anesthesia often leads to asphyxiation [4] , cognitive cardiovascular control has never been demonstrated for this large group of marine mammals. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that porpoises modulate bradycardia according to anticipated dive duration. Two harbor porpoises, instrumented with ECG recording tags, were trained to perform 20- and 80-second stationary dives, during which they adjusted bradycardia to the anticipated duration, demonstrating cognitive control of their dive response.

AB - Marine mammals have adapted to forage while holding their breath in a suite of aquatic habitats from shallow rivers to deep oceans. The key to tolerate such extensive apnea is the dive response, which comprises bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Although initially considered an all-or-nothing reflex [1] , numerous studies on freely diving marine mammals have revealed substantial dynamics of the dive response to meet the impending dive demands of depth, duration and exercise [2] . Such adjustments are not only autonomic responses, but are under acute cognitive control in pinnipeds [3] living amphibiously on land and in water. The fully aquatic cetaceans would similarly benefit from cognitive cardiovascular control; however, even though they have exercise-modulated diving bradycardia [2] and full voluntary control of their respiratory system to such extent that even mild anesthesia often leads to asphyxiation [4] , cognitive cardiovascular control has never been demonstrated for this large group of marine mammals. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that porpoises modulate bradycardia according to anticipated dive duration. Two harbor porpoises, instrumented with ECG recording tags, were trained to perform 20- and 80-second stationary dives, during which they adjusted bradycardia to the anticipated duration, demonstrating cognitive control of their dive response.

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.020

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - R1175-R1176

JO - Current Biology

T2 - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 22

ER -

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ID: 248203964