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Research at St Andrews

Collaborative research and behavioral management

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Author(s)

Steven J. Schapiro, Sarah F. Brosnan, William D. Hopkins, Andrew Whiten, Rachel Kendal, Chet C. Sherwood, Susan P. Lambeth

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Abstract

The behavioral management of captive nonhuman primates (NHPs) can be significantly enhanced through synergistic relationships with noninvasive research projects. Many behavioral and cognitive research procedures are challenging and enriching (physically, cognitively, and/or socially) for the animals (Hopper et al. 2016; Hopkins and Latzman 2017) without involving any invasive (surgical, biopsy, etc.) procedures. Noninvasive behavioral research programs present the primates with opportunities to choose to voluntarily participate (or not), providing them with greater control over their circumstances than they would have in the absence of such procedures. Providing NHPs with control is of importance when attempting to establish “functionally appropriate captive environments.” However, it must be emphasized that research designs in which access to food and/or fluid is restricted would not really satisfy the criteria associated with voluntary participation.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Primate Behavioral Management
PublisherCRC Press
Pages243-254
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781498731966
ISBN (Print)9781498731959
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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