Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Come dine with me: food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Come dine with me : food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). / King, Stephanie Laura; Janik, Vincent M.

In: Animal Cognition, Vol. 18, No. 4, 07.2015, p. 969-974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

King, SL & Janik, VM 2015, 'Come dine with me: food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)', Animal Cognition, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 969-974. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7

APA

King, S. L., & Janik, V. M. (2015). Come dine with me: food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Animal Cognition, 18(4), 969-974. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7

Vancouver

King SL, Janik VM. Come dine with me: food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Animal Cognition. 2015 Jul;18(4):969-974. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7

Author

King, Stephanie Laura ; Janik, Vincent M. / Come dine with me : food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). In: Animal Cognition. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 969-974.

Bibtex - Download

@article{b4e5a90fd7d64099bbc1e9de9ff444d6,
title = "Come dine with me: food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)",
abstract = "Food-related signalling is widespread in the animal kingdom with some food-associated vocalizations considered functionally referential. Food calls can, however, vary greatly in the type of information they convey. Thus, there are a multitude of purposes for which food calls are used, including social recruitment, caller spacing, the indication of type, quantity, quality, divisibility of food, the caller’s hunger level and even as tools to manipulate prey behaviour. Yet little work has focused on the social aspect of food calling in animals. We investigated the association of social signals in wild bottlenose dolphins with foraging behaviour where context-specific food-associated calls are commonly produced. Our data showed that specific social signals were significantly correlated with food call production and these calls rarely occurred in the absence of food calls. We suggest that animals are sharing additional information on the food patch itself with their social affiliates.",
keywords = "Food calls, Bottlenose dolphin, Signature whistles, Vocal learning, Call matching",
author = "King, {Stephanie Laura} and Janik, {Vincent M.}",
note = "The project was funded by a BBSRC Studentship to S.L.K., and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship and a Fellowship of the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin to V.M.J.",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "969--974",
journal = "Animal Cognition",
issn = "1435-9448",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Come dine with me

T2 - food-associated social signalling in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

AU - King, Stephanie Laura

AU - Janik, Vincent M.

N1 - The project was funded by a BBSRC Studentship to S.L.K., and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship and a Fellowship of the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin to V.M.J.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Food-related signalling is widespread in the animal kingdom with some food-associated vocalizations considered functionally referential. Food calls can, however, vary greatly in the type of information they convey. Thus, there are a multitude of purposes for which food calls are used, including social recruitment, caller spacing, the indication of type, quantity, quality, divisibility of food, the caller’s hunger level and even as tools to manipulate prey behaviour. Yet little work has focused on the social aspect of food calling in animals. We investigated the association of social signals in wild bottlenose dolphins with foraging behaviour where context-specific food-associated calls are commonly produced. Our data showed that specific social signals were significantly correlated with food call production and these calls rarely occurred in the absence of food calls. We suggest that animals are sharing additional information on the food patch itself with their social affiliates.

AB - Food-related signalling is widespread in the animal kingdom with some food-associated vocalizations considered functionally referential. Food calls can, however, vary greatly in the type of information they convey. Thus, there are a multitude of purposes for which food calls are used, including social recruitment, caller spacing, the indication of type, quantity, quality, divisibility of food, the caller’s hunger level and even as tools to manipulate prey behaviour. Yet little work has focused on the social aspect of food calling in animals. We investigated the association of social signals in wild bottlenose dolphins with foraging behaviour where context-specific food-associated calls are commonly produced. Our data showed that specific social signals were significantly correlated with food call production and these calls rarely occurred in the absence of food calls. We suggest that animals are sharing additional information on the food patch itself with their social affiliates.

KW - Food calls

KW - Bottlenose dolphin

KW - Signature whistles

KW - Vocal learning

KW - Call matching

U2 - 10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7

DO - 10.1007/s10071-015-0851-7

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 969

EP - 974

JO - Animal Cognition

JF - Animal Cognition

SN - 1435-9448

IS - 4

ER -

Related by author

  1. Signal-specific amplitude adjustment to noise in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    Kragh, I. M., McHugh, K., Wells, R. S., Sayigh, L. S., Janik, V. M., Tyack, P. L. & Jensen, F. H., 3 Dec 2019, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 222, 23, 11 p., jeb216606.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Bottlenose dolphin calves have multi-year elevations of plasma oxytocin compared to all other age classes

    Robinson, K. J., Ternes, K., Hazon, N., Wells, R. & Janik, V. M., 13 Nov 2019, In : General and Comparative Endocrinology. In press

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Managing the effects of noise from ship traffic, seismic surveying and construction on marine mammals in Antarctica

    Erbe, C., Dähne, M., Gordon, J., Herata, H., Houser, D., Koschinski, S., Leaper, R., McCauley, R., Miller, B., Müller, M., Murray, A., Oswald, J., Scholik-Schlomer, A., Schuster, M., van Opzeeland, I. & Janik, V. M., 6 Nov 2019, In : Frontiers in Marine Science. 6, 21 p., 647.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Formant modification through vocal production learning in gray seals

    Stansbury, A. & Janik, V. M., 8 Jul 2019, In : Current Biology. 29, 13, p. 2244-2249 6 p., e4.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Effects of impulsive noise on marine mammals: investigating range-dependent risk

    Hastie, G., Merchant, N., Goetz, T., Russell, D. J. F., Thompson, P. & Janik, V. M., Jul 2019, In : Ecological Applications. 29, 5, 10 p., e01906.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Animal Cognition (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)
    1 Jan 201831 Dec 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Animal Cognition (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)
    1 Jan 201731 Dec 2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  3. Animal Cognition (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)
    2015 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Animal Cognition (Journal)

    Josep Call (Member of editorial board)
    2006 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Animal Cognition (Journal)

    Vincent Janik (Member of editorial board)
    2004 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Absolute brain size predicts dog breed differences in executive function

    Horschler, D. J., Hare, B., Call, J., Kaminski, J., Miklosi, A. & MacLean, E. L., Mar 2019, In : Animal Cognition. 22, 2, p. 187-198 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Evidence for discrimination between feeding sounds of familiar fish and unfamiliar mammal-eating killer whale ecotypes by long-finned pilot whales

    Curé, C., Isojunno, S., I Vester, H., Visser, F., Oudejans, M., Biassoni, N., Massenet, M., Barluet de Beauchesne, L., J Wensveen, P., Sivle, L. D., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., Sep 2019, In : Animal Cognition. 22, 5, p. 863-882 20 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Innovative problem solving in great apes: the role of visual feedback in the floating peanut task

    Ebel, S. J., Schmelz, M., Herrmann, E. & Call, J., Sep 2019, In : Animal Cognition. 22, 5, p. 791-805 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Social learning about construction behaviour via an artefact

    Breen, A. J., Bonneaud, C. C., Healy, S. D. & Guillette, L. M., May 2019, In : Animal Cognition. 22, 3, p. 305–315 11 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Stereotypic horses (Equus caballus) are not cognitively impaired

    Briefer Freymond, S., Ruet, A., Grivaz, M., Fuentes, C., Zuberbühler, K., Bachmann, I. & Briefer, E. F., Jan 2019, In : Animal Cognition. 22, 1, p. 17-33 17 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 159851264

Top