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Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke

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Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke. / Stephens, William E.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 21, No. 1, 18.12.2017, p. 10-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Stephens, WE 2017, 'Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke' Tobacco Control, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 10-17. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808

APA

Stephens, W. E. (2017). Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke. Tobacco Control, 21(1), 10-17. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808

Vancouver

Stephens WE. Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke. Tobacco Control. 2017 Dec 18;21(1):10-17. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808

Author

Stephens, William E. / Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke. In: Tobacco Control. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 10-17.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ebab24ee205b4dce87f06729b5be2bb9,
title = "Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke",
abstract = "Background Quantifying relative harm caused by inhaling the aerosol emissions of vapourised nicotine products compared with smoking combustible tobacco is an important issue for public health.Methods The cancer potencies of various nicotine-delivering aerosols are modelled using published chemical analyses of emissions and their associated inhalation unit risks. Potencies are compared using a conversion procedure for expressing smoke and e-cigarette vapours in common units. Lifetime cancer risks are calculated from potencies using daily consumption estimates.Results The aerosols form a spectrum of cancer potencies spanning five orders of magnitude from uncontaminated air to tobacco smoke. E-cigarette emissions span most of this range with the preponderance of products having potencies<1{\%} of tobacco smoke and falling within two orders of magnitude of a medicinal nicotine inhaler; however, a small minority have much higher potencies. These high-risk results tend to be associated with high levels of carbonyls generated when excessive power is delivered to the atomiser coil. Samples of a prototype heat-not-burn device have lower cancer potencies than tobacco smoke by at least one order of magnitude, but higher potencies than most e-cigarettes. Mean lifetime risks decline in the sequence: combustible cigarettes >> heat-not-burn >> e-cigarettes (normal power)≥nicotine inhaler.Conclusions Optimal combinations of device settings, liquid formulation and vaping behaviour normally result in e-cigarette emissions with much less carcinogenic potency than tobacco smoke, notwithstanding there are circumstances in which the cancer risks of e-cigarette emissions can escalate, sometimes substantially. These circumstances are usually avoidable when the causes are known.",
author = "Stephens, {William E.}",
note = "{\circledC} Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "10--17",
journal = "Tobacco Control",
issn = "0964-4563",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing the cancer potencies of emissions from vapourised nicotine products including e-cigarettes with those of tobacco smoke

AU - Stephens, William E.

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2017/12/18

Y1 - 2017/12/18

N2 - Background Quantifying relative harm caused by inhaling the aerosol emissions of vapourised nicotine products compared with smoking combustible tobacco is an important issue for public health.Methods The cancer potencies of various nicotine-delivering aerosols are modelled using published chemical analyses of emissions and their associated inhalation unit risks. Potencies are compared using a conversion procedure for expressing smoke and e-cigarette vapours in common units. Lifetime cancer risks are calculated from potencies using daily consumption estimates.Results The aerosols form a spectrum of cancer potencies spanning five orders of magnitude from uncontaminated air to tobacco smoke. E-cigarette emissions span most of this range with the preponderance of products having potencies<1% of tobacco smoke and falling within two orders of magnitude of a medicinal nicotine inhaler; however, a small minority have much higher potencies. These high-risk results tend to be associated with high levels of carbonyls generated when excessive power is delivered to the atomiser coil. Samples of a prototype heat-not-burn device have lower cancer potencies than tobacco smoke by at least one order of magnitude, but higher potencies than most e-cigarettes. Mean lifetime risks decline in the sequence: combustible cigarettes >> heat-not-burn >> e-cigarettes (normal power)≥nicotine inhaler.Conclusions Optimal combinations of device settings, liquid formulation and vaping behaviour normally result in e-cigarette emissions with much less carcinogenic potency than tobacco smoke, notwithstanding there are circumstances in which the cancer risks of e-cigarette emissions can escalate, sometimes substantially. These circumstances are usually avoidable when the causes are known.

AB - Background Quantifying relative harm caused by inhaling the aerosol emissions of vapourised nicotine products compared with smoking combustible tobacco is an important issue for public health.Methods The cancer potencies of various nicotine-delivering aerosols are modelled using published chemical analyses of emissions and their associated inhalation unit risks. Potencies are compared using a conversion procedure for expressing smoke and e-cigarette vapours in common units. Lifetime cancer risks are calculated from potencies using daily consumption estimates.Results The aerosols form a spectrum of cancer potencies spanning five orders of magnitude from uncontaminated air to tobacco smoke. E-cigarette emissions span most of this range with the preponderance of products having potencies<1% of tobacco smoke and falling within two orders of magnitude of a medicinal nicotine inhaler; however, a small minority have much higher potencies. These high-risk results tend to be associated with high levels of carbonyls generated when excessive power is delivered to the atomiser coil. Samples of a prototype heat-not-burn device have lower cancer potencies than tobacco smoke by at least one order of magnitude, but higher potencies than most e-cigarettes. Mean lifetime risks decline in the sequence: combustible cigarettes >> heat-not-burn >> e-cigarettes (normal power)≥nicotine inhaler.Conclusions Optimal combinations of device settings, liquid formulation and vaping behaviour normally result in e-cigarette emissions with much less carcinogenic potency than tobacco smoke, notwithstanding there are circumstances in which the cancer risks of e-cigarette emissions can escalate, sometimes substantially. These circumstances are usually avoidable when the causes are known.

U2 - 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808

DO - 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053808

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 10

EP - 17

JO - Tobacco Control

T2 - Tobacco Control

JF - Tobacco Control

SN - 0964-4563

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 250713926