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Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders. / Fregosi, Selene; Harris, Danielle V.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Mellinger, David K.; Negretti, Christina; Moretti, David J.; Martin, Stephen W.; Matsuyama, Brian; Dugan, Peter J.; Klinck, Holger.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 147, No. 2, 10.02.2020, p. 961-977.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Fregosi, S, Harris, DV, Matsumoto, H, Mellinger, DK, Negretti, C, Moretti, DJ, Martin, SW, Matsuyama, B, Dugan, PJ & Klinck, H 2020, 'Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 147, no. 2, pp. 961-977. https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0000617

APA

Fregosi, S., Harris, D. V., Matsumoto, H., Mellinger, D. K., Negretti, C., Moretti, D. J., Martin, S. W., Matsuyama, B., Dugan, P. J., & Klinck, H. (2020). Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 147(2), 961-977. https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0000617

Vancouver

Fregosi S, Harris DV, Matsumoto H, Mellinger DK, Negretti C, Moretti DJ et al. Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2020 Feb 10;147(2):961-977. https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0000617

Author

Fregosi, Selene ; Harris, Danielle V. ; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi ; Mellinger, David K. ; Negretti, Christina ; Moretti, David J. ; Martin, Stephen W. ; Matsuyama, Brian ; Dugan, Peter J. ; Klinck, Holger. / Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2020 ; Vol. 147, No. 2. pp. 961-977.

Bibtex - Download

@article{100e6801dc634ab7b324bdacadf5a67d,
title = "Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders",
abstract = "Acoustically equipped deep-water mobile autonomous platforms can be used to survey for marine mammals over intermediate spatiotemporal scales. Direct comparisons to fixed recorders are necessary to evaluate these tools as passive acoustic monitoring platforms. One glider and two drifting deep-water floats were simultaneously deployed within a deep-water cabled hydrophone array to quantitatively assess their survey capabilities. The glider was able to follow a pre-defined track while float movement was somewhat unpredictable. Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) 20 Hz pulses were recorded by all hydrophones throughout the two-week deployment. Calls were identified using a template detector, which performed similarly across recorder types. The glider data contained up to 78% fewer detections per hour due to increased low-frequency flow noise present during glider descents. The glider performed comparably to the floats and fixed recorders at coarser temporal scales; hourly and daily presence of detections did not vary by recorder type. Flow noise was related to glider speed through water and dive state. Glider speeds through water of 25 cm/s or less are suggested to minimize flow noise and the importance of glider ballasting, detector characterization, and normalization by effort when interpreting glider-collected data and applying it to marine mammal density estimation are discussed. ",
keywords = "Statistical analysis, Acoustic noise, Aquatic ecology, Animal communication, Bioacoustics of mammals, Electronic noise, Oceanography, Spectrograms, Regression analysis, Hydrophone",
author = "Selene Fregosi and Harris, {Danielle V.} and Haruyoshi Matsumoto and Mellinger, {David K.} and Christina Negretti and Moretti, {David J.} and Martin, {Stephen W.} and Brian Matsuyama and Dugan, {Peter J.} and Holger Klinck",
note = "The authors thank Alex Turpin for his work on implementing the acoustic system on the glider and floats and for his help in the field, Ronald Morrissey and the crew of the RSC4 for assistance with the field work, and Anatoli Erofeev for glider piloting services and expertise. We thank Mark Baumgartner, two additional anonymous reviewers, and Ari Friedlaender and Selina Heppell (SF's Ph.D. Committee) for their thoughtful review and feedback on the manuscript. Funding for this work was provided by the Living Marine Resources Program Grant No. N39430-14-C-1435 and Office of Naval Research Grant No. N00014-15-1-2142. S.F. was supported by the National Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship. This is PMEL Contribution No. 4932.",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1121/10.0000617",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
pages = "961--977",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of fin whale 20 Hz call detections by deep-water mobile autonomous and stationary recorders

AU - Fregosi, Selene

AU - Harris, Danielle V.

AU - Matsumoto, Haruyoshi

AU - Mellinger, David K.

AU - Negretti, Christina

AU - Moretti, David J.

AU - Martin, Stephen W.

AU - Matsuyama, Brian

AU - Dugan, Peter J.

AU - Klinck, Holger

N1 - The authors thank Alex Turpin for his work on implementing the acoustic system on the glider and floats and for his help in the field, Ronald Morrissey and the crew of the RSC4 for assistance with the field work, and Anatoli Erofeev for glider piloting services and expertise. We thank Mark Baumgartner, two additional anonymous reviewers, and Ari Friedlaender and Selina Heppell (SF's Ph.D. Committee) for their thoughtful review and feedback on the manuscript. Funding for this work was provided by the Living Marine Resources Program Grant No. N39430-14-C-1435 and Office of Naval Research Grant No. N00014-15-1-2142. S.F. was supported by the National Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship. This is PMEL Contribution No. 4932.

PY - 2020/2/10

Y1 - 2020/2/10

N2 - Acoustically equipped deep-water mobile autonomous platforms can be used to survey for marine mammals over intermediate spatiotemporal scales. Direct comparisons to fixed recorders are necessary to evaluate these tools as passive acoustic monitoring platforms. One glider and two drifting deep-water floats were simultaneously deployed within a deep-water cabled hydrophone array to quantitatively assess their survey capabilities. The glider was able to follow a pre-defined track while float movement was somewhat unpredictable. Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) 20 Hz pulses were recorded by all hydrophones throughout the two-week deployment. Calls were identified using a template detector, which performed similarly across recorder types. The glider data contained up to 78% fewer detections per hour due to increased low-frequency flow noise present during glider descents. The glider performed comparably to the floats and fixed recorders at coarser temporal scales; hourly and daily presence of detections did not vary by recorder type. Flow noise was related to glider speed through water and dive state. Glider speeds through water of 25 cm/s or less are suggested to minimize flow noise and the importance of glider ballasting, detector characterization, and normalization by effort when interpreting glider-collected data and applying it to marine mammal density estimation are discussed.

AB - Acoustically equipped deep-water mobile autonomous platforms can be used to survey for marine mammals over intermediate spatiotemporal scales. Direct comparisons to fixed recorders are necessary to evaluate these tools as passive acoustic monitoring platforms. One glider and two drifting deep-water floats were simultaneously deployed within a deep-water cabled hydrophone array to quantitatively assess their survey capabilities. The glider was able to follow a pre-defined track while float movement was somewhat unpredictable. Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) 20 Hz pulses were recorded by all hydrophones throughout the two-week deployment. Calls were identified using a template detector, which performed similarly across recorder types. The glider data contained up to 78% fewer detections per hour due to increased low-frequency flow noise present during glider descents. The glider performed comparably to the floats and fixed recorders at coarser temporal scales; hourly and daily presence of detections did not vary by recorder type. Flow noise was related to glider speed through water and dive state. Glider speeds through water of 25 cm/s or less are suggested to minimize flow noise and the importance of glider ballasting, detector characterization, and normalization by effort when interpreting glider-collected data and applying it to marine mammal density estimation are discussed.

KW - Statistical analysis

KW - Acoustic noise

KW - Aquatic ecology

KW - Animal communication

KW - Bioacoustics of mammals

KW - Electronic noise

KW - Oceanography

KW - Spectrograms

KW - Regression analysis

KW - Hydrophone

U2 - 10.1121/10.0000617

DO - 10.1121/10.0000617

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85079395473

VL - 147

SP - 961

EP - 977

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 266604381

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