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Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud

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Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud. / Böing, Steven J.; Dritschel, David G.; Parker, Douglas J.; Blyth, Alan M.

In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Vol. In press, 29.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Böing, SJ, Dritschel, DG, Parker, DJ & Blyth, AM 2019, 'Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud' Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, vol. In press. https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.3532

APA

Böing, S. J., Dritschel, D. G., Parker, D. J., & Blyth, A. M. (2019). Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, In press. https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.3532

Vancouver

Böing SJ, Dritschel DG, Parker DJ, Blyth AM. Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 2019 Apr 29;In press. https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.3532

Author

Böing, Steven J. ; Dritschel, David G. ; Parker, Douglas J. ; Blyth, Alan M. / Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud. In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 2019 ; Vol. In press.

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@article{e991a6154c7e432d9231f89e51e00883,
title = "Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud",
abstract = "The ascent of a moist thermal is used to test a recently developed essentially Lagrangian model for simulating moist convection. In this Moist-Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model, a number of parcels are used to represent the flow in each grid cell. This has the advantage that the parcels provide an efficient and explicit representation of subgrid scale flow. The model is compared against Eulerian Large-Eddy Simulations with a version of the Met Office NERC Cloud model (MONC) that solves the same equations in a more traditional Eulerian scheme. Both models perform the same idealised simulation of the effects of latent heat release and evaporation, rather than a specific atmospheric regime.Dynamical features evolve similarly throughout the development of the thermal using both approaches. Subgrid scale properties of small-scale eddies captured by the MPIC model can be explicitly reconstructed on a finer grid. MPIC simulations thus resolve smaller features when using the same grid spacing as MONC, which is useful for detailed studies of turbulence in clouds.The convergence of bulk properties is also used to compare the two models. Most of these properties converge rapidly, though the probability distribution function of liquid water converges only slowly with grid resolution in MPIC. This may imply that the current implementation of the parcel mixing mechanism underestimates small-scale mixing.Finally, it is shown how Lagrangian parcels can be used to study the origin of cloud air in a consistent manner in MPIC.",
keywords = "Clouds, Convection, Thermals, Numerical method",
author = "B{\"o}ing, {Steven J.} and Dritschel, {David G.} and Parker, {Douglas J.} and Blyth, {Alan M.}",
note = "The authors gratefully acknowledge support for this research from the EPSRC Maths Foresees Network. The numerical method development was carried out under the grant “A prototype vortex-in-cell algorithm for modelling moist convection” from March to October 2016. Steven B{\"o}ing, Doug Parker and Alan Blyth are partially funded through the NERC/Met Office Joint Programme on Understanding and Representing Atmospheric Convection across Scales (Grant NE/N013840/1). Doug Parker is supported by a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award and by the Met Office Academic Partnership.",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1002/qj.3532",
language = "English",
volume = "In press",
journal = "Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society",
issn = "0035-9009",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the Moist Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model with large-eddy simulation for an idealized cloud

AU - Böing, Steven J.

AU - Dritschel, David G.

AU - Parker, Douglas J.

AU - Blyth, Alan M.

N1 - The authors gratefully acknowledge support for this research from the EPSRC Maths Foresees Network. The numerical method development was carried out under the grant “A prototype vortex-in-cell algorithm for modelling moist convection” from March to October 2016. Steven Böing, Doug Parker and Alan Blyth are partially funded through the NERC/Met Office Joint Programme on Understanding and Representing Atmospheric Convection across Scales (Grant NE/N013840/1). Doug Parker is supported by a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award and by the Met Office Academic Partnership.

PY - 2019/4/29

Y1 - 2019/4/29

N2 - The ascent of a moist thermal is used to test a recently developed essentially Lagrangian model for simulating moist convection. In this Moist-Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model, a number of parcels are used to represent the flow in each grid cell. This has the advantage that the parcels provide an efficient and explicit representation of subgrid scale flow. The model is compared against Eulerian Large-Eddy Simulations with a version of the Met Office NERC Cloud model (MONC) that solves the same equations in a more traditional Eulerian scheme. Both models perform the same idealised simulation of the effects of latent heat release and evaporation, rather than a specific atmospheric regime.Dynamical features evolve similarly throughout the development of the thermal using both approaches. Subgrid scale properties of small-scale eddies captured by the MPIC model can be explicitly reconstructed on a finer grid. MPIC simulations thus resolve smaller features when using the same grid spacing as MONC, which is useful for detailed studies of turbulence in clouds.The convergence of bulk properties is also used to compare the two models. Most of these properties converge rapidly, though the probability distribution function of liquid water converges only slowly with grid resolution in MPIC. This may imply that the current implementation of the parcel mixing mechanism underestimates small-scale mixing.Finally, it is shown how Lagrangian parcels can be used to study the origin of cloud air in a consistent manner in MPIC.

AB - The ascent of a moist thermal is used to test a recently developed essentially Lagrangian model for simulating moist convection. In this Moist-Parcel-In-Cell (MPIC) model, a number of parcels are used to represent the flow in each grid cell. This has the advantage that the parcels provide an efficient and explicit representation of subgrid scale flow. The model is compared against Eulerian Large-Eddy Simulations with a version of the Met Office NERC Cloud model (MONC) that solves the same equations in a more traditional Eulerian scheme. Both models perform the same idealised simulation of the effects of latent heat release and evaporation, rather than a specific atmospheric regime.Dynamical features evolve similarly throughout the development of the thermal using both approaches. Subgrid scale properties of small-scale eddies captured by the MPIC model can be explicitly reconstructed on a finer grid. MPIC simulations thus resolve smaller features when using the same grid spacing as MONC, which is useful for detailed studies of turbulence in clouds.The convergence of bulk properties is also used to compare the two models. Most of these properties converge rapidly, though the probability distribution function of liquid water converges only slowly with grid resolution in MPIC. This may imply that the current implementation of the parcel mixing mechanism underestimates small-scale mixing.Finally, it is shown how Lagrangian parcels can be used to study the origin of cloud air in a consistent manner in MPIC.

KW - Clouds

KW - Convection

KW - Thermals

KW - Numerical method

U2 - 10.1002/qj.3532

DO - 10.1002/qj.3532

M3 - Article

VL - In press

JO - Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society

T2 - Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society

JF - Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society

SN - 0035-9009

ER -

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ID: 258414649