Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS)

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Standard

Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS). / Scott Hayward, Lindesay Alexandra Sarah; MacKenzie, Monique Lea; Donovan, Carl Robert; Walker, Cameron; Ashe, Erin.

University of St Andrews, 2011. 31 p. (CREEM Technical Report; No. 2011-2).

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Harvard

Scott Hayward, LAS, MacKenzie, ML, Donovan, CR, Walker, C & Ashe, E 2011, Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS). CREEM Technical Report, no. 2011-2, University of St Andrews.

APA

Scott Hayward, L. A. S., MacKenzie, M. L., Donovan, C. R., Walker, C., & Ashe, E. (2011). Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS). (CREEM Technical Report; No. 2011-2). University of St Andrews.

Vancouver

Scott Hayward LAS, MacKenzie ML, Donovan CR, Walker C, Ashe E. Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS). University of St Andrews, 2011. 31 p. (CREEM Technical Report; 2011-2).

Author

Scott Hayward, Lindesay Alexandra Sarah ; MacKenzie, Monique Lea ; Donovan, Carl Robert ; Walker, Cameron ; Ashe, Erin. / Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS). University of St Andrews, 2011. 31 p. (CREEM Technical Report; 2011-2).

Bibtex - Download

@book{662af2ed5dcd40fbb511a34589876c09,
title = "Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS)",
abstract = "Conventional smoothing over complicated coastal and island regions may result in errors across boundaries, due to the use of Euclidean distances to represent inter-point similarity. The new Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS) method presented here, uses estimated geodesic distances, model averaging and a local radial basis function to provide improved smoothing over complex domains. CReSS is compared, via simulation, to recent related smoothing techniques, Thin Plate Splines (TPS, Harder and Desmarais, 1972), geodesic low rank TPS [Wang and Ranalli, 2007] and the Soap film smoother [Wood et al., 2008]. The GLTPS method cannot be used in areas with islands and SOAP can be hard to parameterize. CReSS is comparable with, if not better than, all considered methods on a range of simulations. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.",
keywords = "Geodesic distance, Local radial basis, Thin plate splines, Model averaging",
author = "{Scott Hayward}, {Lindesay Alexandra Sarah} and MacKenzie, {Monique Lea} and Donovan, {Carl Robert} and Cameron Walker and Erin Ashe",
note = "This work is supported with funding from NERC UK",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
series = "CREEM Technical Report",
publisher = "University of St Andrews",
number = "2011-2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - BOOK

T1 - Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS)

AU - Scott Hayward, Lindesay Alexandra Sarah

AU - MacKenzie, Monique Lea

AU - Donovan, Carl Robert

AU - Walker, Cameron

AU - Ashe, Erin

N1 - This work is supported with funding from NERC UK

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Conventional smoothing over complicated coastal and island regions may result in errors across boundaries, due to the use of Euclidean distances to represent inter-point similarity. The new Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS) method presented here, uses estimated geodesic distances, model averaging and a local radial basis function to provide improved smoothing over complex domains. CReSS is compared, via simulation, to recent related smoothing techniques, Thin Plate Splines (TPS, Harder and Desmarais, 1972), geodesic low rank TPS [Wang and Ranalli, 2007] and the Soap film smoother [Wood et al., 2008]. The GLTPS method cannot be used in areas with islands and SOAP can be hard to parameterize. CReSS is comparable with, if not better than, all considered methods on a range of simulations. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

AB - Conventional smoothing over complicated coastal and island regions may result in errors across boundaries, due to the use of Euclidean distances to represent inter-point similarity. The new Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS) method presented here, uses estimated geodesic distances, model averaging and a local radial basis function to provide improved smoothing over complex domains. CReSS is compared, via simulation, to recent related smoothing techniques, Thin Plate Splines (TPS, Harder and Desmarais, 1972), geodesic low rank TPS [Wang and Ranalli, 2007] and the Soap film smoother [Wood et al., 2008]. The GLTPS method cannot be used in areas with islands and SOAP can be hard to parameterize. CReSS is comparable with, if not better than, all considered methods on a range of simulations. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

KW - Geodesic distance

KW - Local radial basis

KW - Thin plate splines

KW - Model averaging

M3 - Other report

T3 - CREEM Technical Report

BT - Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS)

PB - University of St Andrews

ER -

Related by author

  1. Complex Region Spatial Smoother (CReSS)

    Scott Hayward, L. A. S., MacKenzie, M. L., Donovan, C. R., Walker, C. & Ashe, E., 28 Apr 2014, In : Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. 23, 2, p. 340-360

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Quantifying the Power to Detect Change: methodological development and implementation using the R package MRSeaPower.

    MacKenzie, M. L., Scott-Hayward, L. A. S., Paxton, C. G. M. & Burt, M. L., 27 Oct 2017, Quantifying the Power to Detect Change: methodological development and implementation using the R package MRSeaPower.. http://www.gov.scot/Topics/marine/marineenergy/Research/SB9/MRSeamethod: The Scottish Government, p. 1 139 p. CREEM-13804-2016-1. Provided to the Scottish Government and Marine Scotland Science (USA/012/15

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther contribution

ID: 15725189