Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Cooperation in children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Open Access Status

  • Embargoed (until 3/06/20)

Abstract

Cooperation is central to what makes us human. It is so deeply entrenched in our nature that it can be seen at the heart of every culture, whether it takes the form of group hunting, shared child-rearing, or large-scale, multi-national institutions such as the UN. And yet in contrast to the constancy of other forms of cooperation in non-human animals, such as termite-mound building or honey bee dancing, the changing face of human cooperation makes it seem more fragile, and its mechanisms more elusive. As with other features of our behaviour, human cooperation is the product of both genetic and cultural evolution. Studying cooperation in children, in different cultural environments, and in contrast to other species, provides a valuable window into the ways in which these two forms of inheritance interact over development, and a chance to distil out its constitutive components.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R470-R473
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2019

    Research areas

  • Cooperation, Children, Cognition

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. The role of association in pre-schoolers' solutions to "spoon tests" of future planning

    Dickerson, K. L., Ainge, J. A. & Seed, A. M., 23 Jul 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 14, p. 2309-2313

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Function and flexibility of object exploration in kea and new caledonian crows

    Lambert, M. L., Schiestl, M., Schwing, R., Taylor, A. H., Gajdon, G. K., Slocombe, K. E. & Seed, A. M., 27 Sep 2017, In : Royal Society Open Science. 4, 9, 170652.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Diffusion of novel foraging behaviour in Amazon parrots through social learning

    Picard, A. M., Hogan, L., Lambert, M. L., Wilkinson, A., Seed, A. M. & Slocombe, K., Mar 2017, In : Animal Cognition. 20, 2, p. 285-298 14 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Current Biology (Journal)

    Kate Arnold (Reviewer)
    2007 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Current Biology (Journal)

    Richard William Byrne (Member of editorial board)
    20052014

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Formant modification through vocal production learning in gray seals

    Stansbury, A. & Janik, V. M., 20 Jun 2019, In : Current Biology. 29, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Males with a mother living in their group have higher paternity success in bonobos but not chimpanzees

    Surbeck, M., Boesch, C., Crockford, C., Emery Thompson, M., Furuichi, T., Fruth, B., Hohmann, G., Ishizuka, S., Machanda, Z., Muller, M. M., Pusey, A., Sakamaki, T., Tokuyama, N., Walker, K., Wragham, R., Wroblewski, E., Zuberbuhler, K., Vigilant, L. & Langergraber, K., 20 May 2019, In : Current Biology. 29, 10, p. R354-R355

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. The greenbeard effect

    Gardner, A., Jun 2019, In : Current Biology. 29, 11, p. R430-R431

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Bonobos prefer individuals that hinder others over those that help

    Krupenye, C. & Hare, B., 22 Jan 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 2, p. 280-286 e5.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 256704775

Top