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Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification

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Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification. / Allison, Nicola; Cohen, I.; Finch, Adrian Anthony; Erez, J.; Tudhope, A.W.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 5, 5741, 22.12.2014.

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Allison, N, Cohen, I, Finch, AA, Erez, J & Tudhope, AW 2014, 'Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification' Nature Communications, vol. 5, 5741. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6741

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Allison, N., Cohen, I., Finch, A. A., Erez, J., & Tudhope, A. W. (2014). Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification. Nature Communications, 5, [5741]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6741

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Allison N, Cohen I, Finch AA, Erez J, Tudhope AW. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification. Nature Communications. 2014 Dec 22;5. 5741. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6741

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Allison, Nicola ; Cohen, I. ; Finch, Adrian Anthony ; Erez, J. ; Tudhope, A.W. / Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification. In: Nature Communications. 2014 ; Vol. 5.

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@article{71a285d5cd22479792889709bab6c3a6,
title = "Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification",
abstract = "The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO32−] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.",
author = "Nicola Allison and I. Cohen and Finch, {Adrian Anthony} and J. Erez and A.W. Tudhope",
note = "This work was supported by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (awards NER/A/S/2003/00473 and NE/G015791/1 to N.A. and A.A.F.; NER/GR3/12021 to A.W.T.). Participation of J.E. and I.C. in this study was supported by DFG project Trion and the Israel Science Foundation (grants 870/05 and 551/10).",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1038/ncomms6741",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification

AU - Allison, Nicola

AU - Cohen, I.

AU - Finch, Adrian Anthony

AU - Erez, J.

AU - Tudhope, A.W.

N1 - This work was supported by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (awards NER/A/S/2003/00473 and NE/G015791/1 to N.A. and A.A.F.; NER/GR3/12021 to A.W.T.). Participation of J.E. and I.C. in this study was supported by DFG project Trion and the Israel Science Foundation (grants 870/05 and 551/10).

PY - 2014/12/22

Y1 - 2014/12/22

N2 - The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO32−] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

AB - The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO32−] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

UR - http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/141211/ncomms6741/full/ncomms6741.html#supplementary-information

U2 - 10.1038/ncomms6741

DO - 10.1038/ncomms6741

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - Nature Communications

T2 - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 5741

ER -

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ID: 173619675