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Cross-cultural differences in adult Theory of Mind abilities: a comparison of native-English speakers and native-Chinese speakers on the self/other differentiation task

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Theory of Mind (ToM) refers to the ability to compute and attribute mental states to ourselves and other people. It is currently unclear whether ToM abilities are universal or whether they can be culturally influenced. To address this question, this research explored potential differences in engagement of ToM processes between two different cultures, Western (individualist) and Chinese
(collectivist), using a sample of healthy adults. Participants completed a computerized false-belief task, in which they attributed beliefs to either themselves or another person, in a matched design, allowing direct comparison between ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ oriented conditions. Results revealed that both native-English speakers and native-Chinese individuals responded significantly faster to selforiented than other-oriented questions. Results also showed that when a trial required a ‘perspective-shift’, participants from both cultures were slower to shift from Self-to-Other than from Other-to-Self. Results indicate that, despite differences in collectivism scores, culture does not influence task-performance, with similar results found for both Western and non-Western
participants, suggesting core and potentially universal similarities in the ToM mechanism across these two cultures.
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Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
VolumeOnline First
Early online date10 Feb 2018
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 10 Feb 2018

    Research areas

  • Theory of Mind, Cross-cultural, Perspective-taking, False-belief, Social cognition

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  1. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (Journal)

    Paul Barry Hibbard (Member of editorial board)
    1 Aug 2009 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial workEditor of research journal

  2. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (Journal)

    Jentzsch, I. (Member of editorial board)
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ID: 251693705