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Demanding expectations: exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe

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Demanding expectations : exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe. / Reid, Louise; Ellsworth-Krebs, Katherine.

In: Energy Research and Social Science, Vol. 71, 101821, 01.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Reid, L & Ellsworth-Krebs, K 2021, 'Demanding expectations: exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe', Energy Research and Social Science, vol. 71, 101821. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821

APA

Reid, L., & Ellsworth-Krebs, K. (2021). Demanding expectations: exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe. Energy Research and Social Science, 71, [101821]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821

Vancouver

Reid L, Ellsworth-Krebs K. Demanding expectations: exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe. Energy Research and Social Science. 2021 Jan;71. 101821. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821

Author

Reid, Louise ; Ellsworth-Krebs, Katherine. / Demanding expectations : exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe. In: Energy Research and Social Science. 2021 ; Vol. 71.

Bibtex - Download

@article{92067e025c354cf89c683a9424d7c2aa,
title = "Demanding expectations: exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe",
abstract = "In this study, we advance thinking around microgeneration for heat, moving debates on from issues of adoption and performance to bring richer and more sophisticated understandings of how and why households install and live with renewable energy technologies. We draw on a study with 32 households in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, presenting qualitative data collected through an online photo journal to provide insights on the subjective experience of microgeneration for heat technology. We identified a tension between the installation and operational phases of microgeneration for heat systems highlighting that routine, daily domestic practices were at least, if not more, important than the building fabric when seeking to deliver energy savings. This tension was common to both United Kingdom and Dutch households and all microgeneration for heat types, although more pronounced for those with biomass systems. We also explore how householders{\textquoteright} ideas of the future impact on the use of and demand for microgeneration for heat systems; with United Kingdom participants more likely to anticipate greater demand and have systems they felt were {\textquoteleft}over capacity{\textquoteright}. We argue that householders{\textquoteright} perspectives, particularly in relation to expectations around future energy demand, are generally overlooked in renewable energy research.",
keywords = "Microgeneration, Energy demand, Domestic practices, Home, Online journal, UK, Netherlands",
author = "Louise Reid and Katherine Ellsworth-Krebs",
note = "This work was funded by Economic and Social Research Council (Grant Number ES/K009516/1).",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
journal = "Energy Research and Social Science",
issn = "2214-6296",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Demanding expectations

T2 - exploring the experience of distributed heat generation in Europe

AU - Reid, Louise

AU - Ellsworth-Krebs, Katherine

N1 - This work was funded by Economic and Social Research Council (Grant Number ES/K009516/1).

PY - 2021/1

Y1 - 2021/1

N2 - In this study, we advance thinking around microgeneration for heat, moving debates on from issues of adoption and performance to bring richer and more sophisticated understandings of how and why households install and live with renewable energy technologies. We draw on a study with 32 households in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, presenting qualitative data collected through an online photo journal to provide insights on the subjective experience of microgeneration for heat technology. We identified a tension between the installation and operational phases of microgeneration for heat systems highlighting that routine, daily domestic practices were at least, if not more, important than the building fabric when seeking to deliver energy savings. This tension was common to both United Kingdom and Dutch households and all microgeneration for heat types, although more pronounced for those with biomass systems. We also explore how householders’ ideas of the future impact on the use of and demand for microgeneration for heat systems; with United Kingdom participants more likely to anticipate greater demand and have systems they felt were ‘over capacity’. We argue that householders’ perspectives, particularly in relation to expectations around future energy demand, are generally overlooked in renewable energy research.

AB - In this study, we advance thinking around microgeneration for heat, moving debates on from issues of adoption and performance to bring richer and more sophisticated understandings of how and why households install and live with renewable energy technologies. We draw on a study with 32 households in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, presenting qualitative data collected through an online photo journal to provide insights on the subjective experience of microgeneration for heat technology. We identified a tension between the installation and operational phases of microgeneration for heat systems highlighting that routine, daily domestic practices were at least, if not more, important than the building fabric when seeking to deliver energy savings. This tension was common to both United Kingdom and Dutch households and all microgeneration for heat types, although more pronounced for those with biomass systems. We also explore how householders’ ideas of the future impact on the use of and demand for microgeneration for heat systems; with United Kingdom participants more likely to anticipate greater demand and have systems they felt were ‘over capacity’. We argue that householders’ perspectives, particularly in relation to expectations around future energy demand, are generally overlooked in renewable energy research.

KW - Microgeneration

KW - Energy demand

KW - Domestic practices

KW - Home

KW - Online journal

KW - UK

KW - Netherlands

U2 - 10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821

DO - 10.1016/j.erss.2020.101821

M3 - Article

VL - 71

JO - Energy Research and Social Science

JF - Energy Research and Social Science

SN - 2214-6296

M1 - 101821

ER -

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