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Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem

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Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem. / Lang, T. J.

In: Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum, Vol. 21, No. 1, 06.2017, p. 63-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Lang, TJ 2017, 'Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem' Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 63-72. DOI: 10.1515/zac-2017-0004

APA

Lang, T. J. (2017). Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem. DOI: 10.1515/zac-2017-0004

Vancouver

Lang TJ. Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem. Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum. 2017 Jun;21(1):63-72. Available from, DOI: 10.1515/zac-2017-0004

Author

Lang, T. J./ Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem. In: Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 63-72

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@article{f3d536fe2b4545bdac86d208ab6e47f9,
title = "Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem",
abstract = "In his landmark work on Marcion, Adolf von Harnack became the first modern scholar to propose that Tertullian only knew Marcion’s Gospel and Apostolikon in Latin translation. This proposition obtained early support but has been questioned in more recent years, the more common conjecture now being that Tertullian himself translated Marcion’s Greek into Latin as needed. In deciding this matter, scholars have compared the citations of Marcion reproduced in Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem with corresponding Gospel and Pauline citations elsewhere in Tertullian’s writings and then other extant Latin traditions. This nexus of data is then evaluated in terms of vocabulary and stylistic variation. The results of such a method are largely a matter of how one is predisposed to read the evidence. A way forward in this debate is to attend more closely to potential argumentative implications of a Latin versus Greek Vorlage and, specifically, to instances where arguments presented in Tertullian’s Latin might unravel, or at least become differently interesting, if retrojected into Marcion’s Greek. Tertullian’s discussion in Adversus Marcionem 5,18,1 of Ephesians 3:9, a so-called locus classicus of Marcion’s theology, is one such text, and one that complicates quests for a single Latin or Greek source behind Tertullian’s usage.",
keywords = "Marcion, Apostolikon, Tertullian, Adversus Marcionem, Adolf von Harnack, Ephesians 3:9",
author = "Lang, {T. J.}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1515/zac-2017-0004",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "63--72",
journal = "Zeitschrift f{\"u}r Antikes Christentum",
issn = "0949-9571",
publisher = "de Gruyter",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Did Tertullian read Marcion in Latin? Grammatical evidence from the Greek of Ephesians 3:9 in Marcion’s Apostolikon as presented in the Latin of Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem

AU - Lang,T. J.

PY - 2017/6

Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - In his landmark work on Marcion, Adolf von Harnack became the first modern scholar to propose that Tertullian only knew Marcion’s Gospel and Apostolikon in Latin translation. This proposition obtained early support but has been questioned in more recent years, the more common conjecture now being that Tertullian himself translated Marcion’s Greek into Latin as needed. In deciding this matter, scholars have compared the citations of Marcion reproduced in Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem with corresponding Gospel and Pauline citations elsewhere in Tertullian’s writings and then other extant Latin traditions. This nexus of data is then evaluated in terms of vocabulary and stylistic variation. The results of such a method are largely a matter of how one is predisposed to read the evidence. A way forward in this debate is to attend more closely to potential argumentative implications of a Latin versus Greek Vorlage and, specifically, to instances where arguments presented in Tertullian’s Latin might unravel, or at least become differently interesting, if retrojected into Marcion’s Greek. Tertullian’s discussion in Adversus Marcionem 5,18,1 of Ephesians 3:9, a so-called locus classicus of Marcion’s theology, is one such text, and one that complicates quests for a single Latin or Greek source behind Tertullian’s usage.

AB - In his landmark work on Marcion, Adolf von Harnack became the first modern scholar to propose that Tertullian only knew Marcion’s Gospel and Apostolikon in Latin translation. This proposition obtained early support but has been questioned in more recent years, the more common conjecture now being that Tertullian himself translated Marcion’s Greek into Latin as needed. In deciding this matter, scholars have compared the citations of Marcion reproduced in Tertullian’s Adversus Marcionem with corresponding Gospel and Pauline citations elsewhere in Tertullian’s writings and then other extant Latin traditions. This nexus of data is then evaluated in terms of vocabulary and stylistic variation. The results of such a method are largely a matter of how one is predisposed to read the evidence. A way forward in this debate is to attend more closely to potential argumentative implications of a Latin versus Greek Vorlage and, specifically, to instances where arguments presented in Tertullian’s Latin might unravel, or at least become differently interesting, if retrojected into Marcion’s Greek. Tertullian’s discussion in Adversus Marcionem 5,18,1 of Ephesians 3:9, a so-called locus classicus of Marcion’s theology, is one such text, and one that complicates quests for a single Latin or Greek source behind Tertullian’s usage.

KW - Marcion

KW - Apostolikon

KW - Tertullian

KW - Adversus Marcionem

KW - Adolf von Harnack

KW - Ephesians 3:9

U2 - 10.1515/zac-2017-0004

DO - 10.1515/zac-2017-0004

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 63

EP - 72

JO - Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum

T2 - Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum

JF - Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum

SN - 0949-9571

IS - 1

ER -

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