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Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish

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Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish. / Webster, Michael Munro; Adams, E L; Laland, Kevin Neville.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 76, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 17-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Webster, MM, Adams, EL & Laland, KN 2008, 'Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish' Animal Behaviour, vol. 76, no. 1, pp. 17-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010

APA

Webster, M. M., Adams, E. L., & Laland, K. N. (2008). Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish. Animal Behaviour, 76(1), 17-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010

Vancouver

Webster MM, Adams EL, Laland KN. Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish. Animal Behaviour. 2008 Jul;76(1):17-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010

Author

Webster, Michael Munro ; Adams, E L ; Laland, Kevin Neville. / Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish. In: Animal Behaviour. 2008 ; Vol. 76, No. 1. pp. 17-23.

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@article{ca70b73a683441db993ec17c9e00c67d,
title = "Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish",
abstract = "In many social species individuals have to make adaptive decisions about with whom to group. Self-referent matching of chemical social information specific to patterns of diet and habitat use is an important factor underlying social organization in shoaling fishes. In a series of three experiments, we gave female Whitecloud mountain minnows, Tanichthys albonubes, a binary choice between shoaling with stimulus groups fed upon the same or a different diet to themselves. Focal fish spent significantly more time shoaling with the group whose individuals had consumed the same diet as themselves, were significantly more likely to follow such a group when the two stimulus groups diverged in a simulated shoal fission event, and were significantly more likely to feed from a prey patch containing a neutral food that was situated close to the same diet stimulus group than from an identical one located close to the stimulus group fed the alternative diet. By grouping with others that are exploiting the same resources, individuals potentially gain useful information about the location of resources. (C) 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "chemical communication, diet choice, guppy, patch choice, Poecilia reticulata, shoal choice, social learning, social organization, SOCIAL RECOGNITION, STICKLEBACKS, GUPPIES, CATFISH, SALMON, ODORS",
author = "Webster, {Michael Munro} and Adams, {E L} and Laland, {Kevin Neville}",
year = "2008",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
pages = "17--23",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diet-specific chemical cues influence association preferences and prey patch use in a shoaling fish

AU - Webster, Michael Munro

AU - Adams, E L

AU - Laland, Kevin Neville

PY - 2008/7

Y1 - 2008/7

N2 - In many social species individuals have to make adaptive decisions about with whom to group. Self-referent matching of chemical social information specific to patterns of diet and habitat use is an important factor underlying social organization in shoaling fishes. In a series of three experiments, we gave female Whitecloud mountain minnows, Tanichthys albonubes, a binary choice between shoaling with stimulus groups fed upon the same or a different diet to themselves. Focal fish spent significantly more time shoaling with the group whose individuals had consumed the same diet as themselves, were significantly more likely to follow such a group when the two stimulus groups diverged in a simulated shoal fission event, and were significantly more likely to feed from a prey patch containing a neutral food that was situated close to the same diet stimulus group than from an identical one located close to the stimulus group fed the alternative diet. By grouping with others that are exploiting the same resources, individuals potentially gain useful information about the location of resources. (C) 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - In many social species individuals have to make adaptive decisions about with whom to group. Self-referent matching of chemical social information specific to patterns of diet and habitat use is an important factor underlying social organization in shoaling fishes. In a series of three experiments, we gave female Whitecloud mountain minnows, Tanichthys albonubes, a binary choice between shoaling with stimulus groups fed upon the same or a different diet to themselves. Focal fish spent significantly more time shoaling with the group whose individuals had consumed the same diet as themselves, were significantly more likely to follow such a group when the two stimulus groups diverged in a simulated shoal fission event, and were significantly more likely to feed from a prey patch containing a neutral food that was situated close to the same diet stimulus group than from an identical one located close to the stimulus group fed the alternative diet. By grouping with others that are exploiting the same resources, individuals potentially gain useful information about the location of resources. (C) 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - chemical communication

KW - diet choice

KW - guppy

KW - patch choice

KW - Poecilia reticulata

KW - shoal choice

KW - social learning

KW - social organization

KW - SOCIAL RECOGNITION

KW - STICKLEBACKS

KW - GUPPIES

KW - CATFISH

KW - SALMON

KW - ODORS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44949237010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.12.010

M3 - Article

VL - 76

SP - 17

EP - 23

JO - Animal Behaviour

T2 - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 412366