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Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures

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Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures. / Grosse, Katja; Call, Josep; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Language Learning and Development, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2015, p. 310-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Grosse, K, Call, J, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2015, 'Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures', Language Learning and Development, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 310-330. https://doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2014.955246

APA

Grosse, K., Call, J., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2015). Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures. Language Learning and Development, 11(4), 310-330. https://doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2014.955246

Vancouver

Grosse K, Call J, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures. Language Learning and Development. 2015;11(4):310-330. https://doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2014.955246

Author

Grosse, Katja ; Call, Josep ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures. In: Language Learning and Development. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 310-330.

Bibtex - Download

@article{e66c39e5d2a24f1bb6a5ba82a9438633,
title = "Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures",
abstract = "In all human cultures, people gesture iconically. However, the evolutionary basis of iconic gestures is unknown. In this study, chimpanzees and bonobos, and 2- and 3-year-old children, learned how to operate two apparatuses to get rewards. Then, at test, only a human adult had access to the apparatuses, and participants could instruct her about how to obtain the rewards. Children frequently produced appropriate iconic gestures, but with the exception of one human-raised chimpanzee, great apes did not gesture iconically. However, chimpanzees pointed to a reward outside the apparatus in another experimental condition, showing their motivation and ability to communicate with the human to request it. They also manipulated a duplicate apparatus in appropriate ways, though it was unclear if they did this to communicate with the human. Although great apes may have some of the prerequisite skills involved, iconic gestures come naturally to humans in a way that they do not for great apes.",
author = "Katja Grosse and Josep Call and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/15475441.2014.955246",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "310--330",
journal = "Language Learning and Development",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in the ability of apes and children to instruct others using gestures

AU - Grosse, Katja

AU - Call, Josep

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In all human cultures, people gesture iconically. However, the evolutionary basis of iconic gestures is unknown. In this study, chimpanzees and bonobos, and 2- and 3-year-old children, learned how to operate two apparatuses to get rewards. Then, at test, only a human adult had access to the apparatuses, and participants could instruct her about how to obtain the rewards. Children frequently produced appropriate iconic gestures, but with the exception of one human-raised chimpanzee, great apes did not gesture iconically. However, chimpanzees pointed to a reward outside the apparatus in another experimental condition, showing their motivation and ability to communicate with the human to request it. They also manipulated a duplicate apparatus in appropriate ways, though it was unclear if they did this to communicate with the human. Although great apes may have some of the prerequisite skills involved, iconic gestures come naturally to humans in a way that they do not for great apes.

AB - In all human cultures, people gesture iconically. However, the evolutionary basis of iconic gestures is unknown. In this study, chimpanzees and bonobos, and 2- and 3-year-old children, learned how to operate two apparatuses to get rewards. Then, at test, only a human adult had access to the apparatuses, and participants could instruct her about how to obtain the rewards. Children frequently produced appropriate iconic gestures, but with the exception of one human-raised chimpanzee, great apes did not gesture iconically. However, chimpanzees pointed to a reward outside the apparatus in another experimental condition, showing their motivation and ability to communicate with the human to request it. They also manipulated a duplicate apparatus in appropriate ways, though it was unclear if they did this to communicate with the human. Although great apes may have some of the prerequisite skills involved, iconic gestures come naturally to humans in a way that they do not for great apes.

U2 - 10.1080/15475441.2014.955246

DO - 10.1080/15475441.2014.955246

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 310

EP - 330

JO - Language Learning and Development

JF - Language Learning and Development

IS - 4

ER -

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ID: 136173015

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