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Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus). / Pérez, Jacobo Marrero; Jensen, Frants H.; Rojano-Doñate, Laia; Aguilar de Soto, Natacha.

In: Marine Mammal Science, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.2017, p. 59-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Pérez, JM, Jensen, FH, Rojano-Doñate, L & Aguilar de Soto, N 2017, 'Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus)' Marine Mammal Science, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 59-79. DOI: 10.1111/mms.12344

APA

Pérez, J. M., Jensen, F. H., Rojano-Doñate, L., & Aguilar de Soto, N. (2017). Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus). DOI: 10.1111/mms.12344

Vancouver

Pérez JM, Jensen FH, Rojano-Doñate L, Aguilar de Soto N. Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus). Marine Mammal Science. 2017 Jan;33(1):59-79. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/mms.12344

Author

Pérez, Jacobo Marrero ; Jensen, Frants H. ; Rojano-Doñate, Laia ; Aguilar de Soto, Natacha. / Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus). In: Marine Mammal Science. 2017 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 59-79

Bibtex - Download

@article{f9abd2cb2bd34ed0a0848126bbb258f7,
title = "Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus)",
abstract = "Toothed whales use a pneumatic sound generator to produce echolocation and communication sounds. Increasing hydrostatic pressure at depth influences the amplitude and duration of calls but not of echolocation clicks. Here we test the hypothesis that information transfer at depth might be facilitated by click-based communication signals. Wild short-finned pilot whales (27) instrumented with multisensor DTAGs produced four main types of communication signals: low- and medium-frequency calls (median fundamental frequency: 1.7 and 2.9 kHz), two-component calls (median frequency of the low and high frequency components: 2 and 9 kHz), and rasps (burst-pulses with median interclick interval of 21 ms). Rasps can be confused with foraging buzzes, but rasps are shorter and slower, and are not associated with fast changes in body acceleration nor reduced acoustic output of buzzes, characteristic of prey capture attempts. Contrary to calls, the energy flux density of rasps was not significantly affected by depth. This, and a different information content, may explain the observed increase in the relative occurrence of rasps with respect to calls at depth, and supports the hypothesis that click-based communication signals may facilitate communication under high hydrostatic pressure. However, calls are produced at depth also, indicating that they may carry additional information relevant for deep-diving animals, including potential communication among whales diving at the same time in this highly social deep-diving species.",
keywords = "Information transfer, Communication, Acoustic physiology, Animal behavior, Acoustic tags",
author = "P{\'e}rez, {Jacobo Marrero} and Jensen, {Frants H.} and Laia Rojano-Do{\~n}ate and {Aguilar de Soto}, Natacha",
note = "Data collection was funded by the National Ocean Partnership Program project via a research agreement between La Laguna University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. JM was funded by project CETOBAPH number CGL2009-13112 of the Spanish Ministry of Innovation and Competency. FHJ was supported by the Danish Council for Independent Research | Natural Sciences and the Carlsberg Foundation, and NAS is currently funded by the EU Horizon 2020 project ECOSOUND.",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/mms.12344",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "59--79",
journal = "Marine Mammal Science",
issn = "0824-0469",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Different modes of acoustic communication in deep-diving short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus)

AU - Pérez,Jacobo Marrero

AU - Jensen,Frants H.

AU - Rojano-Doñate,Laia

AU - Aguilar de Soto,Natacha

N1 - Data collection was funded by the National Ocean Partnership Program project via a research agreement between La Laguna University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. JM was funded by project CETOBAPH number CGL2009-13112 of the Spanish Ministry of Innovation and Competency. FHJ was supported by the Danish Council for Independent Research | Natural Sciences and the Carlsberg Foundation, and NAS is currently funded by the EU Horizon 2020 project ECOSOUND.

PY - 2017/1

Y1 - 2017/1

N2 - Toothed whales use a pneumatic sound generator to produce echolocation and communication sounds. Increasing hydrostatic pressure at depth influences the amplitude and duration of calls but not of echolocation clicks. Here we test the hypothesis that information transfer at depth might be facilitated by click-based communication signals. Wild short-finned pilot whales (27) instrumented with multisensor DTAGs produced four main types of communication signals: low- and medium-frequency calls (median fundamental frequency: 1.7 and 2.9 kHz), two-component calls (median frequency of the low and high frequency components: 2 and 9 kHz), and rasps (burst-pulses with median interclick interval of 21 ms). Rasps can be confused with foraging buzzes, but rasps are shorter and slower, and are not associated with fast changes in body acceleration nor reduced acoustic output of buzzes, characteristic of prey capture attempts. Contrary to calls, the energy flux density of rasps was not significantly affected by depth. This, and a different information content, may explain the observed increase in the relative occurrence of rasps with respect to calls at depth, and supports the hypothesis that click-based communication signals may facilitate communication under high hydrostatic pressure. However, calls are produced at depth also, indicating that they may carry additional information relevant for deep-diving animals, including potential communication among whales diving at the same time in this highly social deep-diving species.

AB - Toothed whales use a pneumatic sound generator to produce echolocation and communication sounds. Increasing hydrostatic pressure at depth influences the amplitude and duration of calls but not of echolocation clicks. Here we test the hypothesis that information transfer at depth might be facilitated by click-based communication signals. Wild short-finned pilot whales (27) instrumented with multisensor DTAGs produced four main types of communication signals: low- and medium-frequency calls (median fundamental frequency: 1.7 and 2.9 kHz), two-component calls (median frequency of the low and high frequency components: 2 and 9 kHz), and rasps (burst-pulses with median interclick interval of 21 ms). Rasps can be confused with foraging buzzes, but rasps are shorter and slower, and are not associated with fast changes in body acceleration nor reduced acoustic output of buzzes, characteristic of prey capture attempts. Contrary to calls, the energy flux density of rasps was not significantly affected by depth. This, and a different information content, may explain the observed increase in the relative occurrence of rasps with respect to calls at depth, and supports the hypothesis that click-based communication signals may facilitate communication under high hydrostatic pressure. However, calls are produced at depth also, indicating that they may carry additional information relevant for deep-diving animals, including potential communication among whales diving at the same time in this highly social deep-diving species.

KW - Information transfer

KW - Communication

KW - Acoustic physiology

KW - Animal behavior

KW - Acoustic tags

U2 - 10.1111/mms.12344

DO - 10.1111/mms.12344

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 59

EP - 79

JO - Marine Mammal Science

T2 - Marine Mammal Science

JF - Marine Mammal Science

SN - 0824-0469

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 244955950