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Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys

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Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys. / Claidiere, Nicolas; Messer, Emily Jane Elizabeth; Whiten, Andrew; Hoppitt, William John Edward.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 23, No. 13, 08.07.2013, p. 1251-1255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Claidiere, N, Messer, EJE, Whiten, A & Hoppitt, WJE 2013, 'Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys' Current Biology, vol 23, no. 13, pp. 1251-1255. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036

APA

Claidiere, N., Messer, E. J. E., Whiten, A., & Hoppitt, W. J. E. (2013). Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys. Current Biology, 23(13), 1251-1255. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036

Vancouver

Claidiere N, Messer EJE, Whiten A, Hoppitt WJE. Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys. Current Biology. 2013 Jul 8;23(13):1251-1255. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036

Author

Claidiere, Nicolas ; Messer, Emily Jane Elizabeth ; Whiten, Andrew ; Hoppitt, William John Edward. / Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys. In: Current Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 13. pp. 1251-1255

Bibtex - Download

@article{9b4ad3b01957469d89b12b3a6b589ebd,
title = "Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys",
abstract = "Social network analyses [1-5] and experimental studies of social learning [6-10] have each become important domains of animal behavior research in recent years yet have remained largely separate. Here we bring them together, providing the first demonstration of how social networks may shape the diffusion of socially learned foraging techniques [11]. One technique for opening an artificial fruit was seeded in the dominant male of a group of squirrel monkeys and an alternative technique in the dominant male of a second group. We show that the two techniques spread preferentially in the groups in which they were initially seeded and that this process was influenced by monkeys' association patterns. Eigenvector centrality predicted both the speed with which an individual would first succeed in opening the artificial fruit and the probability that they would acquire the cultural variant seeded in their group. These findings demonstrate a positive role of social networks in determining how a new foraging technique diffuses through a population.",
keywords = "Social learning, monkeys, social networks",
author = "Nicolas Claidiere and Messer, {Emily Jane Elizabeth} and Andrew Whiten and Hoppitt, {William John Edward}",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "1251--1255",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "13",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diffusion dynamics of socially learned foraging techniques in squirrel monkeys

AU - Claidiere,Nicolas

AU - Messer,Emily Jane Elizabeth

AU - Whiten,Andrew

AU - Hoppitt,William John Edward

PY - 2013/7/8

Y1 - 2013/7/8

N2 - Social network analyses [1-5] and experimental studies of social learning [6-10] have each become important domains of animal behavior research in recent years yet have remained largely separate. Here we bring them together, providing the first demonstration of how social networks may shape the diffusion of socially learned foraging techniques [11]. One technique for opening an artificial fruit was seeded in the dominant male of a group of squirrel monkeys and an alternative technique in the dominant male of a second group. We show that the two techniques spread preferentially in the groups in which they were initially seeded and that this process was influenced by monkeys' association patterns. Eigenvector centrality predicted both the speed with which an individual would first succeed in opening the artificial fruit and the probability that they would acquire the cultural variant seeded in their group. These findings demonstrate a positive role of social networks in determining how a new foraging technique diffuses through a population.

AB - Social network analyses [1-5] and experimental studies of social learning [6-10] have each become important domains of animal behavior research in recent years yet have remained largely separate. Here we bring them together, providing the first demonstration of how social networks may shape the diffusion of socially learned foraging techniques [11]. One technique for opening an artificial fruit was seeded in the dominant male of a group of squirrel monkeys and an alternative technique in the dominant male of a second group. We show that the two techniques spread preferentially in the groups in which they were initially seeded and that this process was influenced by monkeys' association patterns. Eigenvector centrality predicted both the speed with which an individual would first succeed in opening the artificial fruit and the probability that they would acquire the cultural variant seeded in their group. These findings demonstrate a positive role of social networks in determining how a new foraging technique diffuses through a population.

KW - Social learning

KW - monkeys

KW - social networks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84879934448&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2013.05.036

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 1251

EP - 1255

JO - Current Biology

T2 - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 13

ER -

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