Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Dissecting children's observational learning of complex actions through selective video displays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Children can learn how to use complex objects by watching others, yet the relative importance of different elements they may observe, such as the interactions of the individual parts of the apparatus, a model's movements, and desirable outcomes, remains unclear. In total, 140 3-year-olds and 140 5-year-olds participated in a study where they observed a video showing tools being used to extract a reward item from a complex puzzle box. Conditions varied according to the elements that could be seen in the video: (a) the whole display, including the model's hands, the tools, and the box; (b) the tools and the box but not the model's hands; (c) the model's hands and the tools but not the box; (d) only the end state with the box opened; and (e) no demonstration. Children's later attempts at the task were coded to establish whether they imitated the hierarchically organized sequence of the model's actions, the action details, and/or the outcome. Children's successful retrieval of the reward from the box and the replication of hierarchical sequence information were reduced in all but the whole display condition. Only once children had attempted the task and witnessed a second demonstration did the display focused on the tools and box prove to be better for hierarchical sequence information than the display focused on the tools and hands only.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-263
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2013

    Research areas

  • Social learning, children,

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Chimpanzees’ behavioural flexibility, social tolerance and use of tool-composites in a progressively challenging foraging problem

    Harrison, R. A., van Leeuwen, E. & Whiten, A., 5 Jan 2021, In: iScience. In press, 102033.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Does culture shape hunting behavior in bonobos?

    Whiten, A., 1 Sep 2020, In: eLife. 9, 3 p., e62104.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

  3. Refining our understanding of the "elephant in the room"

    Whiten, A., 10 Aug 2020, In: The Behavioral and brain sciences. 43, p. e182

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. A unified account of culture should accommodate animal cultures

    Whiten, A., 28 May 2020, In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 43, e118.

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

  5. Wild chimpanzees scaffold youngsters’ learning in a high-tech community

    Whiten, A., 14 Jan 2020, In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 117, 2, p. 802-804 3 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Common knowledge that help is needed increases helping behavior in children

    Siposova, B., Grueneisen, S., Helming, K., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Jan 2021, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 201, 104973.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Better all by myself: gaining personal experience, not watching others, improves 3-year-olds’ performance in a causal trap task

    Yuniarto, L., Gerson, S. & Seed, A. M., Jun 2020, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 194, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Do 7-year-old children understand social leverage?

    Sánchez-Amaro, A., Duguid, S., Call, J. & Tomasello, M., Nov 2020, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 199, 104963.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. How prior experience and task presentation modulate innovation in 6-year-old-children

    Ebel, S. J., Hanus, D. & Call, J., Apr 2019, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 180, p. 87-103 17 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Automatic imitation effects are influenced by experience of synchronous action in children

    O'Sullivan, E. P., Caldwell, C. A. & Bijvoet-van den Berg, S., Jul 2018, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 171, p. 113-130

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 68872628

Top