Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Diving deep in a foraging hotspot: acoustic insights into bottlenose dolphin dive depths and feeding behaviour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

G D Hastie, B Wilson, P M Thompson

School/Research organisations

Abstract

To exploit resources in their environment, odontocete cetaceans have evolved sophisticated diving abilities to allow effective foraging. However, data on the diving behaviour and underwater foraging behaviour remains limited. This study made use of echolocation clicks and other calls to study the diving behaviour of bottlenose dolphins. Dolphins used the full water column and consistently dived to depths of around 50 m, close to the seabed. However, the majority of their time appeared to be spent within the surface layers of the water column. In addition, by localising calls that have been associated with prey capture events (Janik, Proc R Soc Lond Ser B 267:923-927, 2000a), it appeared that certain forms of feeding behaviour occurred primarily at depths of between 20 and 30 m. Furthermore, data on the depth of clicks made before and after these feeding calls suggested that during the minute before the calls, dolphins were consistently diving from the surface to depths close to the seabed, and were subsequently returning to the surface after the calls. This passive acoustic technique proved an accurate method for studying the depth distribution of dolphin vocalisations. By exploiting the natural sounds made by these wild odontocetes, this investigation provided a previously unavailable perspective on the the 3D nature of bottlenose dolphins foraging behaviour. It confirmed that while the dolphins spent the majority of time close to the surface, the full water column was exploited during foraging events.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1181-1188
Number of pages8
JournalMarine Biology
Volume148
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Effects of impulsive noise on marine mammals: investigating range-dependent risk

    Hastie, G., Merchant, N., Goetz, T., Russell, D. J. F., Thompson, P. & Janik, V. M., 12 Jun 2019, In : Ecological Applications. Early View, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Empirical determination of severe trauma in seals from collisions with tidal turbine blades

    Onoufriou, J., Brownlow, A., Moss, S., Hastie, G. & Thompson, D., 14 May 2019, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. Early View, 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Harbour seals avoid tidal turbine noise: implications for collision risk

    Hastie, G. D., Russell, D. J. F., Lepper, P., Elliott, J., Wilson, B., Benjamins, S. & Thompson, D., Mar 2018, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 55, 2, p. 684-693 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Seals and shipping: quantifying population risk and individual exposure to vessel noise

    Jones, E. L., Hastie, G. D., Smout, S., Onoufriou, J., Merchant, N. D., Brookes, K. L. & Thompson, D., Dec 2017, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 54, 6, p. 1930-1940

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Marine Biology (Journal)

    Nora Nell Hanson (Reviewer)
    Mar 2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Behavioural and temporal partitioning of dolphin social groups in the northern Adriatic Sea

    Genov, T., Centrih, T., Kotnjek, P. & Hace, A., Jan 2019, In : Marine Biology. 166, 1, 11 p., 166.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Icelandic herring-eating killer whales feed at night

    Gaëtan, R., Filatova, O. A., Samarra, F. I. P., Fedutin, I. D., Lammers, M. & Miller, P., Feb 2017, In : Marine Biology. 164, 2, 32.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Movements and site fidelity of killer whales (Orcinus orca) relative to seasonal and long-term shifts in herring (Clupea harengus) distribution

    Samarra, F. I. P., Tavares, S. B., Béesau, J., Deecke, V. B., Fennell, A., Miller, P. J. O., Pétursson, H., Sigurjónsson, J. & Víkingsson, G. A., 1 Aug 2017, In : Marine Biology. 164, 15 p., 159.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Marine life of the sea trout

    Thorstad, E. B., Todd, C. D., Uglem, I., Bjørn, P. A., Gargan, P. G., Vollset, K. W., Halttunen, E., Kålås, S., Berg, M. & Finstad, B., Mar 2016, In : Marine Biology. 163, 3, 19 p., 47.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner

    Mendo, T., Semmens, J. M., Lyle, J. M., Tracey, S. R. & Moltschaniwskyj, N., 5 Jan 2016, In : Marine Biology. 163, 2.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 35077207