Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Do social support and eating family meals together play a role in promoting resilience to bullying and cyberbullying in Scottish school children?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Richard J. Shaw, Dorothy B. Currie, Gillian S. Smith, Judith Brown, Daniel J. Smith, Joanna C. Inchley

School/Research organisations

Abstract

This study investigates if cyberbullying is associated with wellbeing independently of traditional bullying and if social support and eating family meals together promotes resilience by buffering adolescents against the consequences of both types of bullying. Data for 5286 eleven, thirteen and fifteen year olds participating in the cross-sectional 2018 Scottish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study were analysed. Adolescent self-report measures were used to assess traditional bullying, cyberbullying, classmate and teacher support and frequency of family meals together. Psychological wellbeing was assessed with the 5-item World Health Organization Wellbeing index. Analyses were conducted separately by gender with multilevel models, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Resilience to bullying and cyberbullying was operationalised using statistical interactions. For both genders, cyberbullying and traditional bullying measures were associated with reduced wellbeing and all social support indicators were associated with increased wellbeing. In models containing both bullying measures, frequent traditional bullying victimisation was associated with a 7.2 (95% CI: 3.4–10.1) reduction in wellbeing score for boys and a 7.2 (95% CI: 4.5–10.0) reduction for girls, while cyberbullying was associated with 10.5 (95% CI: 5.8–15.1) reduction in wellbeing score for boys and 11.1 (95% CI: 6.7–15.5) reduction for girls. For both genders adjusting for classmate support explained away the relationships between traditional bullying and wellbeing, but cyberbullying was associated negatively with wellbeing independent of social support. Only one of 12 interaction tests provided any evidence of resilience. Cyberbullying was associated with a 7.8 (95% CI: 0.2–15.4) reduction in wellbeing score for girls who ate with their family every day, and 17.3 (95% CI: 10.5–24.1) reduction for girls who ate with their families less than weekly. In conclusion, cyberbullying is a strong, albeit rare, threat to adolescent wellbeing. Social support is important for wellbeing, but its ability to buffer adolescents against the consequences of bullying may be limited.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number100485
Number of pages9
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume9
Early online date14 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Sep 2019

    Research areas

  • Cyberbullying, Bullying, Wellbeing, Resilience, Social support

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Domains of spirituality and their associations with positive mental health: a study of adolescents in Canada, England and Scotland

    Michaelson, V., King, N., Inchley, J., Currie, D., Brooks, F. & Pickett, W., Aug 2019, In : Preventive Medicine. 125, p. 12-18

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Adolescent alcohol-related behaviours: trends and inequalities in the WHO European Region, 2002-2014

    Inchley, J. C. (ed.), Currie, D. B. (ed.), Vieno, A. (ed.), Torsheim, T. (ed.), Ferreira-Borges, C. (ed.), Weber, M. (ed.), Barnekow, V. (ed.) & Breda, J. (ed.), 2018, Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe. 94 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

  3. Adolescent obesity and related behaviours: trends and inequalities in the WHO European Region, 2002–2014

    Inchley, J. C. (ed.), Currie, D. B. (ed.), Jewell, J. (ed.), Breda, J. (ed.) & Barnekow, V. (ed.), 17 May 2017, WHO Regional Office for Europe. 87 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Related by journal

  1. Conceptualizing, measuring and evaluating constructs of the adolescent neighbourhood social environment: a systematic review

    Martin, G., Gavine, A., Inchley, J. & Currie, C., Dec 2017, In : SSM - Population Health. 3, p. 335-351 17 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Developmental patterns of adolescent spiritual health in six countries

    Michaelson, V., Brooks, F., Jirásek, I., Inchley, J. C., Whitehead, R. D., King, N., Walsh, S., Davison, C., Mazur, J., Pickett, W. & HBSC Child Spiritual Health Writing Group, 2016, In : SSM - Population Health. 2, p. 292-303

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 261243990

Top