Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Early life stress shapes female reproductive strategy through eggshell pigmentation in Japanese quail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

C. Duval, C. Zimmer, I. Mikšík, P. Cassey, K.A. Spencer

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Physiological constraints on colouration have been widely reported; especially in birds, which trade-off antioxidant responses against colourful costly signals. One female extended phenotypic trait, which might also highlight important physiological trade-offs, is the pigmentation of their eggshells. In ground-nesting species, producing eggs that are visually undetectable by predators is the best camouflage strategy. However, the condition-dependence of eggshell pigmentation, and the pigments role in oxidative stress, may constrain females to trade-off between their antioxidant capacity and maximising the camouflage of their eggs when they deposit eggshell pigments. Developmental stress is one factor that influences female antioxidant capacity, and could lead to variations in eggshell pigmentation that might have crucial consequences on individual fitness if egg crypsis is compromised especially under stressful conditions. We investigated the interaction between developmental and breeding conditions with respect to eggshell pigmentation in Japanese quail. We studied 30 females that bred under both control and stressful conditions, and were exposed to pre- and/or post-natal stress, or neither. Pre- and post-natal stress independently influenced eggshell pigmentation strategies under stressful breeding conditions. Under stressful reproduction, eggshell protoporphyrin concentration and maculation were affected by pre-natal stress, whereas eggshell reflectance and biliverdin concentration were influenced by post-natal stress. These changes may reflect potential adaptive strategies shaped by developmental stress, but additional data on the benefit of egg crypsis in quail, combined with studies on the role of both pigments on chick survival, will help to clarify whether early life stress can enhance fitness through eggshell pigmentation when developmental and reproductive environments match.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-153
Number of pages8
JournalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinology
Volume208
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Acute social isolation alters neurogenomic state in songbird forebrain

    George, J., Bell, Z., Condliffe, D., Doher, K., Abaurrea, T., Spencer, K., Leitao, A., Gahr, M., Hurd, P. & Clayton, D. F., 22 Jul 2019, In : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Latest Articles

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Chronological age, biological age, and individual variation in the stress response in the European starling: a follow-up study

    Gott, A., Andrews, C., Hormigos, M. L., Spencer, K., Bateson, M. & Nettle, D., 23 Oct 2018, In : PeerJ. 6, 19 p., 5842.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Stress hormones, social associations and song learning in zebra finches

    Boogert, N. J., Lachlan, R. F., Spencer, K. A., Templeton, C. N. & Farine, D. R., 26 Sep 2018, In : Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences. 373, 1756, 9 p., 20170290.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. General and Comparative Endocrinology (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Member of editorial board)
    29 May 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. General and Comparative Endocrinology (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Member of editorial board)
    16 Feb 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. General and Comparative Endocrinology (Journal)

    Gordon Cramb (Member of editorial board)
    1 Jan 200831 Dec 2012

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. General and Comparative Endocrinology (Journal)

    Gordon Cramb (Member of editorial board)
    2008 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. General and Comparative Endocrinology (Journal)

    Neil Hazon (Member of editorial board)
    2005 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Bottlenose dolphin calves have multi-year elevations of plasma oxytocin compared to all other age classes

    Robinson, K. J., Ternes, K., Hazon, N., Wells, R. & Janik, V. M., 13 Nov 2019, In : General and Comparative Endocrinology. In press

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function

    Walker, D. J. & Spencer, K. A., 15 Jan 2018, In : General and Comparative Endocrinology. 256, p. 80-88 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  3. Divergent regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein genes in cultured Atlantic salmon myotubes under different models of catabolism and anabolism

    Garcia de la Serrana, D., Jofre, E. N., Martin, S. A. M., Johnston, I. A. & Macqueen, D. J., 1 Jun 2017, In : General and Comparative Endocrinology. 247, p. 53-65 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 156419038

Top