Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Standard

Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris). / Johnson, Mark; Hicknott, L.S.; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P.T.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 275, No. 1631, 22.01.2008, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Johnson, M, Hicknott, LS, Aguilar Soto, N & Madsen, PT 2008, 'Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris)', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 275, no. 1631, pp. 133-139. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2007.1190

APA

Johnson, M., Hicknott, L. S., Aguilar Soto, N., & Madsen, P. T. (2008). Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275(1631), 133-139. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2007.1190

Vancouver

Johnson M, Hicknott LS, Aguilar Soto N, Madsen PT. Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2008 Jan 22;275(1631):133-139. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2007.1190

Author

Johnson, Mark ; Hicknott, L.S. ; Aguilar Soto, N ; Madsen, P.T. / Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris). In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2008 ; Vol. 275, No. 1631. pp. 133-139.

Bibtex - Download

@article{369cc0ebccdf46d08a64515c46a94b34,
title = "Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris)",
abstract = "Toothed whales echolocating in the wild generate clicks with low repetition rates to locate prey but then produce rapid sequences of clicks, called buzzes, when attempting to capture prey. However, little is known about the factors that determine clicking rates or how prey type and behaviour influence echolocation-based foraging. Here we study Blainville's beaked whales foraging in deep water using a multi-sensor DTAG that records both outgoing echolocation clicks and echoes returning from mesopelagic prey. We demonstrate that the clicking rate at the beginning of buzzes is related to the distance between whale and prey, supporting the presumption that whales focus on a specific prey target during the buzz. One whale showed a bimodal relationship between target range and clicking rate producing abnormally slow buzz clicks while attempting to capture large echoic targets, probably schooling prey, with echo duration indicating a school diameter of up to 4.3 m. These targets were only found when the whale performed tight circling manoeuvres spending up to five times longer in water volumes with large targets than with small targets. The result indicates that toothed whales in the wild can adjust their echolocation behaviour and movement for capture of different prey on the basis of structural echo information.",
author = "Mark Johnson and L.S. Hicknott and {Aguilar Soto}, N and P.T. Madsen",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2007.1190",
language = "English",
volume = "275",
pages = "133--139",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "Royal Society of London",
number = "1631",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Echolocation behaviour adapted to prey in foraging Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris)

AU - Johnson, Mark

AU - Hicknott, L.S.

AU - Aguilar Soto, N

AU - Madsen, P.T.

PY - 2008/1/22

Y1 - 2008/1/22

N2 - Toothed whales echolocating in the wild generate clicks with low repetition rates to locate prey but then produce rapid sequences of clicks, called buzzes, when attempting to capture prey. However, little is known about the factors that determine clicking rates or how prey type and behaviour influence echolocation-based foraging. Here we study Blainville's beaked whales foraging in deep water using a multi-sensor DTAG that records both outgoing echolocation clicks and echoes returning from mesopelagic prey. We demonstrate that the clicking rate at the beginning of buzzes is related to the distance between whale and prey, supporting the presumption that whales focus on a specific prey target during the buzz. One whale showed a bimodal relationship between target range and clicking rate producing abnormally slow buzz clicks while attempting to capture large echoic targets, probably schooling prey, with echo duration indicating a school diameter of up to 4.3 m. These targets were only found when the whale performed tight circling manoeuvres spending up to five times longer in water volumes with large targets than with small targets. The result indicates that toothed whales in the wild can adjust their echolocation behaviour and movement for capture of different prey on the basis of structural echo information.

AB - Toothed whales echolocating in the wild generate clicks with low repetition rates to locate prey but then produce rapid sequences of clicks, called buzzes, when attempting to capture prey. However, little is known about the factors that determine clicking rates or how prey type and behaviour influence echolocation-based foraging. Here we study Blainville's beaked whales foraging in deep water using a multi-sensor DTAG that records both outgoing echolocation clicks and echoes returning from mesopelagic prey. We demonstrate that the clicking rate at the beginning of buzzes is related to the distance between whale and prey, supporting the presumption that whales focus on a specific prey target during the buzz. One whale showed a bimodal relationship between target range and clicking rate producing abnormally slow buzz clicks while attempting to capture large echoic targets, probably schooling prey, with echo duration indicating a school diameter of up to 4.3 m. These targets were only found when the whale performed tight circling manoeuvres spending up to five times longer in water volumes with large targets than with small targets. The result indicates that toothed whales in the wild can adjust their echolocation behaviour and movement for capture of different prey on the basis of structural echo information.

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2007.1190

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2007.1190

M3 - Article

VL - 275

SP - 133

EP - 139

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1631

ER -

Related by author

  1. Towards a macroscope: leveraging technology to transform the breadth, scale and resolution of macroecological data

    Dornelas, M., Madin, E. M. P., Bunce, M., DiBattista, J. D., Johnson, M., Madin, J. S., Magurran, A. E., McGill, B. J., Pettorelli, N., Pizarro, O., Williams, S. B., Winter, M. & Bates, A. E., 15 Nov 2019, In : Global Ecology and Biogeography. 28, 12, p. 1937-1948 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Deep-diving pilot whales make cheap, but powerful, echolocation clicks with 50 µL of air

    Foskolos, I., Aguilar de Soto, N., Madsen, P. T. & Johnson, M., 31 Oct 2019, In : Scientific Reports. 9, 9 p., 15720.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Recreational vessels without Automatic Identification System (AIS) dominate anthropogenic noise contributions to a shallow water soundscape

    Hermannsen, L., Mikkelsen, L., Tougaard, J., Beedholm, K., Johnson, M. & Madsen, P. T., 29 Oct 2019, In : Scientific Reports. 9, 10 p., 15477.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. A miniature biomimetic sonar and movement tag to study the biotic environment and predator-prey interactions in aquatic animals

    Goulet, P., Guinet, C., Swift, R., Madsen, P. T. & Johnson, M., Jun 2019, In : Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers. 148, p. 1-11

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Long-term sound and movement recording tags to study natural behavior and reaction to ship noise of seals

    Mikkelsen, L., Johnson, M., Wisniewska, D. M., van Neer, A., Siebert, U., Madsen, P. T. & Teilmann, J., 6 Feb 2019, In : Ecology and Evolution. Early View, 14 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Oscar Eduardo Gaggiotti (Member of editorial board)
    1 Jan 2013 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Kate Arnold (Reviewer)
    2012 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Michael Gordon Ritchie (Editor)
    20102011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)
    2009 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Iain McCombe Matthews (Editor)
    2008 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Advances in research on the impacts of anti-submarine sonar on beaked whales

    Bernaldo De Quirós, Y., Fernandez, A., Baird, R. W., Brownell, R. L., Aguilar De Soto, N., Allen, D., Arbelo, M., Arregui, M., Costidis, A., Fahlman, A., Frantzis, A., Gulland, F. M. D., Iñíguez, M., Johnson, M., Komnenou, A., Koopman, H., Pabst, D. A., Roe, W. D., Sierra, E., Tejedor, M. & 1 others, Schorr, G., 30 Jan 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1895, 20182533.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Linguistic laws in chimpanzee gestural communication

    Heesen, R., Hobaiter, C., Ferrer-i-Cancho, R. & Semple, S., 13 Feb 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1896

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. No evidence that warmer temperatures are associated with selection for smaller body sizes

    Siepielski, A. M., Morrissey, M. B., Carlson, S. M., Francis, C. D., Kingsolver, J. G., Whitney, K. D. & Kruuk, L. E. B., 24 Jul 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1907, 10 p., 20191332.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Northern bottlenose whales in a pristine environment respond strongly to close and distant navy sonar signals

    Wensveen, P. J., Isojunno, S., Hansen, R. R., Von Benda-beckmann, A. M., Kleivane, L., Van Ijsselmuide, S., Lam, F. A., Kvadsheim, P. H., Deruiter, S. L., Curé, C., Narazaki, T., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 20 Mar 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1899, 10 p., 20182592.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 47631625

Top