Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator. / Votier, Stephen C.; Fayet, Annette L.; Bearhop, Stuart; Bodey, Thomas W.; Clark, Bethany L.; Grecian, James; Guilford, Tim; Hamer, Keith C.; Jeglinski, Jana W. E.; Morgan, Greg; Wakefield, Ewan; Patrick, Samantha C.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 284, No. 1859, 20171068, 26.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Votier, SC, Fayet, AL, Bearhop, S, Bodey, TW, Clark, BL, Grecian, J, Guilford, T, Hamer, KC, Jeglinski, JWE, Morgan, G, Wakefield, E & Patrick, SC 2017, 'Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator' Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 284, no. 1859, 20171068. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1068

APA

Votier, S. C., Fayet, A. L., Bearhop, S., Bodey, T. W., Clark, B. L., Grecian, J., ... Patrick, S. C. (2017). Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 284(1859), [20171068]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1068

Vancouver

Votier SC, Fayet AL, Bearhop S, Bodey TW, Clark BL, Grecian J et al. Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2017 Jul 26;284(1859). 20171068. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1068

Author

Votier, Stephen C. ; Fayet, Annette L. ; Bearhop, Stuart ; Bodey, Thomas W. ; Clark, Bethany L. ; Grecian, James ; Guilford, Tim ; Hamer, Keith C. ; Jeglinski, Jana W. E. ; Morgan, Greg ; Wakefield, Ewan ; Patrick, Samantha C. / Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 284, No. 1859.

Bibtex - Download

@article{dd595082c20a44f09aa657e49208ac7d,
title = "Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator",
abstract = "Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a long-lived marine predator— the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Breeders (aged 5+) showed strong IFSF: they had similar routes and were faithful to distal points during successive trips. However, centrally placed immatures (aged 2–3) were far more exploratory and lacked route or foraging site fidelity. Failed breeders were intermediate: some with strong fidelity, others being more exploratory. Individual foraging specializations were previously thought to arise as a function of heritable phenotypic differences or via social transmission. Our results instead suggest a third alternative—in long-lived species foraging sites are learned during exploratory behaviours early in life, which become canalized with age and experience, and refined where possible— the exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis. We speculate similar patterns may be present in other long-lived species and moreover that long periods of immaturity may be a consequence of such memory-based individual foraging strategies.",
keywords = "Ecology of individuals, Exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis, Foraging, Foraging specialization, GPS tracking, Seabird",
author = "Votier, {Stephen C.} and Fayet, {Annette L.} and Stuart Bearhop and Bodey, {Thomas W.} and Clark, {Bethany L.} and James Grecian and Tim Guilford and Hamer, {Keith C.} and Jeglinski, {Jana W. E.} and Greg Morgan and Ewan Wakefield and Patrick, {Samantha C.}",
note = "This work was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (Standard grant no. NE/H007466/1; New Investigators grant no. NE/H007466/1) and a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Leadership Fellowship by the University of Glasgow to J.W.E.J. Data are available via Dryad (http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8m1nf)",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2017.1068",
language = "English",
volume = "284",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "Royal Society of London",
number = "1859",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator

AU - Votier, Stephen C.

AU - Fayet, Annette L.

AU - Bearhop, Stuart

AU - Bodey, Thomas W.

AU - Clark, Bethany L.

AU - Grecian, James

AU - Guilford, Tim

AU - Hamer, Keith C.

AU - Jeglinski, Jana W. E.

AU - Morgan, Greg

AU - Wakefield, Ewan

AU - Patrick, Samantha C.

N1 - This work was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (Standard grant no. NE/H007466/1; New Investigators grant no. NE/H007466/1) and a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Leadership Fellowship by the University of Glasgow to J.W.E.J. Data are available via Dryad (http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8m1nf)

PY - 2017/7/26

Y1 - 2017/7/26

N2 - Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a long-lived marine predator— the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Breeders (aged 5+) showed strong IFSF: they had similar routes and were faithful to distal points during successive trips. However, centrally placed immatures (aged 2–3) were far more exploratory and lacked route or foraging site fidelity. Failed breeders were intermediate: some with strong fidelity, others being more exploratory. Individual foraging specializations were previously thought to arise as a function of heritable phenotypic differences or via social transmission. Our results instead suggest a third alternative—in long-lived species foraging sites are learned during exploratory behaviours early in life, which become canalized with age and experience, and refined where possible— the exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis. We speculate similar patterns may be present in other long-lived species and moreover that long periods of immaturity may be a consequence of such memory-based individual foraging strategies.

AB - Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a long-lived marine predator— the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Breeders (aged 5+) showed strong IFSF: they had similar routes and were faithful to distal points during successive trips. However, centrally placed immatures (aged 2–3) were far more exploratory and lacked route or foraging site fidelity. Failed breeders were intermediate: some with strong fidelity, others being more exploratory. Individual foraging specializations were previously thought to arise as a function of heritable phenotypic differences or via social transmission. Our results instead suggest a third alternative—in long-lived species foraging sites are learned during exploratory behaviours early in life, which become canalized with age and experience, and refined where possible— the exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis. We speculate similar patterns may be present in other long-lived species and moreover that long periods of immaturity may be a consequence of such memory-based individual foraging strategies.

KW - Ecology of individuals

KW - Exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis

KW - Foraging

KW - Foraging specialization

KW - GPS tracking

KW - Seabird

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2017.1068

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2017.1068

M3 - Article

VL - 284

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

T2 - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1859

M1 - 20171068

ER -

Related by author

  1. Individual spatial consistency and dietary flexibility in the migratory behavior of northern gannets wintering in the Northeast Atlantic

    Grecian, W. J., Williams, H. J., Votier, S. C., Bearhop, S., Cleasby, I. R., Grémillet, D., Hamer, K. C., Le Nuz, M., Lescroël, A., Newton, J., Patrick, S. C., Phillips, R. A., Wakefield, E. D. & Bodey, T. W., 12 Jun 2019, In : Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 7, 11 p., 214.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Important at-sea areas of colonial breeding marine predators on the southern Patagonian Shelf

    Baylis, A. M. M., Tierney, M., Orben, R. A., Warwick-Evans, V., Wakefield, E., Grecian, W. J., Trathan, P., Reisinger, R., Ratcliffe, N., Croxall, J., Campioni, L., Catry, P., Crofts, S., Boersma, P. D., Galimberti, F., Granadeiro, J., Handley, J., Hayes, S., Hedd, A., Masello, J. F. & 7 othersMontevecchi, W. A., Pütz, K., Quillfeldt, P., Rebstock, G. A., Sanvito, S., Staniland, I. J. & Brickle, P., 11 Jun 2019, In : Scientific Reports. 9, 13 p., 8517.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Marine protected areas show low overlap with projected distributions of seabird populations in Britain and Ireland

    Critchley, E. J., Grecian, W. J., Kane, A., Jessopp, M. J. & Quinn, J. L., Aug 2018, In : Biological Conservation. 224, p. 309-317 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Understanding the ontogeny of foraging behaviour: insights from combining marine predator bio-logging with satellite-derived oceanography in hidden Markov models

    Grecian, W. J., Lane, J., Michelot, T., Wade, H. M. & Hamer, K. C., 6 Jun 2018, In : Journal of the Royal Society Interface. 15, 143, 9 p., 20180084.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Man-made structures and Apex Predators: Spatial interactions and overlap (MAPS)

    Grecian, W. J., Masden, E. A., Hammond, P. S., Owen, E., Daunt, F., Wanless, S. & Russell, D. JF., Jan 2018, INSITE.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Related by journal

  1. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Oscar Eduardo Gaggiotti (Member of editorial board)
    1 Jan 2013 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Kate Arnold (Reviewer)
    2012 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Michael Gordon Ritchie (Editor)
    20102011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)
    2009 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (Journal)

    Iain McCombe Matthews (Editor)
    2008 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Advances in research on the impacts of anti-submarine sonar on beaked whales

    Bernaldo De Quirós, Y., Fernandez, A., Baird, R. W., Brownell, R. L., Aguilar De Soto, N., Allen, D., Arbelo, M., Arregui, M., Costidis, A., Fahlman, A., Frantzis, A., Gulland, F. M. D., Iñíguez, M., Johnson, M., Komnenou, A., Koopman, H., Pabst, D. A., Roe, W. D., Sierra, E., Tejedor, M. & 1 othersSchorr, G., 30 Jan 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1895, 20182533.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Linguistic laws in chimpanzee gestural communication

    Heesen, R., Hobaiter, C., Ferrer-i-Cancho, R. & Semple, S., 13 Feb 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1896

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. No evidence that warmer temperatures are associated with selection for smaller body sizes

    Siepielski, A. M., Morrissey, M. B., Carlson, S. M., Francis, C. D., Kingsolver, J. G., Whitney, K. D. & Kruuk, L. E. B., 24 Jul 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1907, 10 p., 20191332.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Northern bottlenose whales in a pristine environment respond strongly to close and distant navy sonar signals

    Wensveen, P. J., Isojunno, S., Hansen, R. R., Von Benda-beckmann, A. M., Kleivane, L., Van Ijsselmuide, S., Lam, F. A., Kvadsheim, P. H., Deruiter, S. L., Curé, C., Narazaki, T., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 20 Mar 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1899, 10 p., 20182592.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 250687310