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Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores

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Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores. / Higginson, Andrew D.; Speed, Michael P.; Ruxton, Graeme D.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 300, 07.05.2012, p. 368-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Higginson, AD, Speed, MP & Ruxton, GD 2012, 'Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores', Journal of Theoretical Biology, vol. 300, pp. 368-375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020

APA

Higginson, A. D., Speed, M. P., & Ruxton, G. D. (2012). Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 300, 368-375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020

Vancouver

Higginson AD, Speed MP, Ruxton GD. Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores. Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2012 May 7;300:368-375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020

Author

Higginson, Andrew D. ; Speed, Michael P. ; Ruxton, Graeme D. / Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2012 ; Vol. 300. pp. 368-375.

Bibtex - Download

@article{9a3ff21ea8a94431b76f7445bd5c6b29,
title = "Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores",
abstract = "Many invertebrate herbivores sequester plant toxins from their food, and the availability of toxins and the costs and benefits of sequestering toxins may influence food patch choice. In many plants, young leaves contain higher concentrations of toxins than old leaves and so can be preferred by sequestering herbivores, even if herbivores are more readily detected by predators when on them. We modelled patch use and sequestration strategies for the growth period of herbivores, assuming that the effectiveness of a toxin against predators is positively related to its cost of sequestration and that high-reward patches have higher predation risk. We show that the empirically commonly-observed strategy of moving from a low-reward patch to a high-reward patch can be optimal in a range of circumstances, but especially those that are common in nature. Body size when herbivores are predicted to switch increases with increasing size of maturation under most conditions, whilst use of the high-reward patch increases. Our predictions about how the proportion of time spent in the high-reward patch changes with the distribution and potency of toxins indicate a reason for plant toxins to be relatively mild. We provide further testable predictions about the role of the plant's defence strategy and herbivore behaviour in tritrophic interactions. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
author = "Higginson, {Andrew D.} and Speed, {Michael P.} and Ruxton, {Graeme D.}",
year = "2012",
month = may,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020",
language = "English",
volume = "300",
pages = "368--375",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of anti-predator defence through toxin sequestration on use of alternative food microhabitats by small herbivores

AU - Higginson, Andrew D.

AU - Speed, Michael P.

AU - Ruxton, Graeme D.

PY - 2012/5/7

Y1 - 2012/5/7

N2 - Many invertebrate herbivores sequester plant toxins from their food, and the availability of toxins and the costs and benefits of sequestering toxins may influence food patch choice. In many plants, young leaves contain higher concentrations of toxins than old leaves and so can be preferred by sequestering herbivores, even if herbivores are more readily detected by predators when on them. We modelled patch use and sequestration strategies for the growth period of herbivores, assuming that the effectiveness of a toxin against predators is positively related to its cost of sequestration and that high-reward patches have higher predation risk. We show that the empirically commonly-observed strategy of moving from a low-reward patch to a high-reward patch can be optimal in a range of circumstances, but especially those that are common in nature. Body size when herbivores are predicted to switch increases with increasing size of maturation under most conditions, whilst use of the high-reward patch increases. Our predictions about how the proportion of time spent in the high-reward patch changes with the distribution and potency of toxins indicate a reason for plant toxins to be relatively mild. We provide further testable predictions about the role of the plant's defence strategy and herbivore behaviour in tritrophic interactions. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Many invertebrate herbivores sequester plant toxins from their food, and the availability of toxins and the costs and benefits of sequestering toxins may influence food patch choice. In many plants, young leaves contain higher concentrations of toxins than old leaves and so can be preferred by sequestering herbivores, even if herbivores are more readily detected by predators when on them. We modelled patch use and sequestration strategies for the growth period of herbivores, assuming that the effectiveness of a toxin against predators is positively related to its cost of sequestration and that high-reward patches have higher predation risk. We show that the empirically commonly-observed strategy of moving from a low-reward patch to a high-reward patch can be optimal in a range of circumstances, but especially those that are common in nature. Body size when herbivores are predicted to switch increases with increasing size of maturation under most conditions, whilst use of the high-reward patch increases. Our predictions about how the proportion of time spent in the high-reward patch changes with the distribution and potency of toxins indicate a reason for plant toxins to be relatively mild. We provide further testable predictions about the role of the plant's defence strategy and herbivore behaviour in tritrophic interactions. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020

DO - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.01.020

M3 - Article

VL - 300

SP - 368

EP - 375

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

ER -

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