Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm. / Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Cognition, Vol. 112, No. 2, 08.2009, p. 337-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Buttelmann, D, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2009, 'Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm', Cognition, vol. 112, no. 2, pp. 337-342. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006

APA

Buttelmann, D., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm. Cognition, 112(2), 337-342. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006

Vancouver

Buttelmann D, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm. Cognition. 2009 Aug;112(2):337-342. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006

Author

Buttelmann, David ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm. In: Cognition. 2009 ; Vol. 112, No. 2. pp. 337-342.

Bibtex - Download

@article{6fa3b75000b8412c8995c9ba7658a4d8,
title = "Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm",
abstract = "Recently, several studies have claimed that soon after their first birthday infants understand others' false beliefs. However, some have questioned these findings based on criticisms of the looking-time paradigms used. Here we report a new paradigm to test false belief understanding in infants using a more active behavioral response: helping. Specifically, the task was for infants to help an adult achieve his goal - but to determine that goal infants had to take into account what the adult believed (i.e., whether or not he falsely believed there was a toy inside a box). Results showed that by 18 months of age infants successfully took into account the adult's belief in the process of attempting to determine his goal. Results for 16-month-olds were in the same direction but less clear. These results represent by far the youngest age of false belief understanding in a task with an active behavioral measure. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "False belief, Helping, Theory of mind, Infancy, MIND, ATTRIBUTION, COGNITION",
author = "David Buttelmann and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2009",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "337--342",
journal = "Cognition",
issn = "0010-0277",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eighteen-month-old infants show false belief understanding in an active helping paradigm

AU - Buttelmann, David

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2009/8

Y1 - 2009/8

N2 - Recently, several studies have claimed that soon after their first birthday infants understand others' false beliefs. However, some have questioned these findings based on criticisms of the looking-time paradigms used. Here we report a new paradigm to test false belief understanding in infants using a more active behavioral response: helping. Specifically, the task was for infants to help an adult achieve his goal - but to determine that goal infants had to take into account what the adult believed (i.e., whether or not he falsely believed there was a toy inside a box). Results showed that by 18 months of age infants successfully took into account the adult's belief in the process of attempting to determine his goal. Results for 16-month-olds were in the same direction but less clear. These results represent by far the youngest age of false belief understanding in a task with an active behavioral measure. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Recently, several studies have claimed that soon after their first birthday infants understand others' false beliefs. However, some have questioned these findings based on criticisms of the looking-time paradigms used. Here we report a new paradigm to test false belief understanding in infants using a more active behavioral response: helping. Specifically, the task was for infants to help an adult achieve his goal - but to determine that goal infants had to take into account what the adult believed (i.e., whether or not he falsely believed there was a toy inside a box). Results showed that by 18 months of age infants successfully took into account the adult's belief in the process of attempting to determine his goal. Results for 16-month-olds were in the same direction but less clear. These results represent by far the youngest age of false belief understanding in a task with an active behavioral measure. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - False belief

KW - Helping

KW - Theory of mind

KW - Infancy

KW - MIND

KW - ATTRIBUTION

KW - COGNITION

U2 - 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006

DO - 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.05.006

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 337

EP - 342

JO - Cognition

JF - Cognition

SN - 0010-0277

IS - 2

ER -

Related by author

  1. Young children share more under time pressure than after a delay

    Ploetner, M., Hepach, R., Over, H., Carpenter, M. & Tomasello, M., 16 Mar 2021, In: PLoS One. 16, 3, 10 p., e0248121.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Common knowledge that help is needed increases helping behavior in children

    Siposova, B., Grueneisen, S., Helming, K., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Jan 2021, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 201, 104973.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. A new look at joint attention and common knowledge

    Siposova, B. & Carpenter, M., Aug 2019, In: Cognition. 189, p. 260-274 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Communicative eye contact signals a commitment to cooperate for young children

    Siposova, B., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Oct 2018, In: Cognition. 179, p. 192-201

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Selective copying of the majority suggests children are broadly "optimal-" rather than "over-" imitators

    Evans, C. L., Laland, K. N., Carpenter, M. & Kendal, R. L., 29 Aug 2018, In: Developmental Science. 21, 5, e12637.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Cognition (Journal)

    Josep Call (Member of editorial board)

    2015 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Cognition (Journal)

    Malinda Carpenter (Editor)

    1 Jul 201331 Dec 2014

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Do doorways really matter: investigating memory benefits of event segmentation in a virtual learning environment

    Logie, M. R. & Donaldson, D. I., Apr 2021, In: Cognition. 209, 104578.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Attentional coordination in demonstrator-observer dyads facilitates learning and predicts performance in a novel manual task

    Pagnotta, M., Laland, K. N. & Coco, M. I., Aug 2020, In: Cognition. 201, 104314.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. A new look at joint attention and common knowledge

    Siposova, B. & Carpenter, M., Aug 2019, In: Cognition. 189, p. 260-274 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Communicative eye contact signals a commitment to cooperate for young children

    Siposova, B., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Oct 2018, In: Cognition. 179, p. 192-201

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Intuitive statistical inferences in chimpanzees and humans follow Weber‘s Law

    Eckert, J., Call, J., Hermes, J., Herrmann, E. & Rakoczy, H., Nov 2018, In: Cognition. 180, p. 99-107 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 76292752

Top