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Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community

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Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community. / Selkoe, Kimberly A.; Gaggiotti, Oscar E.; ToBo Lab; Bowen, Brian W.; Toonen, Robert J.

In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 23, No. 12, 16.06.2014, p. 3064-3079.

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Selkoe, KA, Gaggiotti, OE, ToBo Lab, Bowen, BW & Toonen, RJ 2014, 'Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community' Molecular Ecology, vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 3064-3079. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12804

APA

Selkoe, K. A., Gaggiotti, O. E., ToBo Lab, Bowen, B. W., & Toonen, R. J. (2014). Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community. Molecular Ecology, 23(12), 3064-3079. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12804

Vancouver

Selkoe KA, Gaggiotti OE, ToBo Lab, Bowen BW, Toonen RJ. Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community. Molecular Ecology. 2014 Jun 16;23(12):3064-3079. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12804

Author

Selkoe, Kimberly A. ; Gaggiotti, Oscar E. ; ToBo Lab ; Bowen, Brian W. ; Toonen, Robert J. / Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community. In: Molecular Ecology. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 12. pp. 3064-3079.

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@article{72b1025db5a54886b6a9e3c8deb035b3,
title = "Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community",
abstract = "What shapes variation in genetic structure within a community of codistributed species is a central but difficult question for the field of population genetics. With a focus on the isolated coral reef ecosystem of the Hawaiian Archipelago, we assessed how life history traits influence population genetic structure for 35 reef animals. Despite the archipelago's stepping stone configuration, isolation by distance was the least common type of genetic structure, detected in four species. Regional structuring (i.e. division of sites into genetically and spatially distinct regions) was most common, detected in 20 species and nearly in all endemics and habitat specialists. Seven species displayed chaotic (spatially unordered) structuring, and all were nonendemic generalist species. Chaotic structure also associated with relatively high global FST. Pelagic larval duration (PLD) was not a strong predictor of variation in population structure (R2=0.22), but accounting for higher FST values of chaotic and invertebrate species, compared to regionally structured and fish species, doubled the power of PLD to explain variation in global FST (adjusted R2=0.50). Multivariate correlation of eight species traits to six genetic traits highlighted dispersal ability, taxonomy (i.e. fish vs. invertebrate) and habitat specialization as strongest influences on genetics, but otherwise left much variation in genetic traits unexplained. Considering that the study design controlled for many sampling and geographical factors, the extreme interspecific variation in spatial genetic patterns observed for Hawaii marine species may be generated by demographic variability due to species-specific abundance and migration patterns and/or seascape and historical factors.",
keywords = "Chaotic genetic heterogeneity, Community genetics, Hawaii, Marine connectivity, Pelargic larval duration, Stepping stone dispersal",
author = "Selkoe, {Kimberly A.} and Gaggiotti, {Oscar E.} and {ToBo Lab} and Bowen, {Brian W.} and Toonen, {Robert J.}",
note = "This work is upported by the Marine Alliance for Science and technology for Scotland (MASTS).",
year = "2014",
month = "6",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1111/mec.12804",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "3064--3079",
journal = "Molecular Ecology",
issn = "0962-1083",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111)",
number = "12",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emergent patterns of population genetic structure for a coral reef community

AU - Selkoe, Kimberly A.

AU - Gaggiotti, Oscar E.

AU - ToBo Lab

AU - Bowen, Brian W.

AU - Toonen, Robert J.

N1 - This work is upported by the Marine Alliance for Science and technology for Scotland (MASTS).

PY - 2014/6/16

Y1 - 2014/6/16

N2 - What shapes variation in genetic structure within a community of codistributed species is a central but difficult question for the field of population genetics. With a focus on the isolated coral reef ecosystem of the Hawaiian Archipelago, we assessed how life history traits influence population genetic structure for 35 reef animals. Despite the archipelago's stepping stone configuration, isolation by distance was the least common type of genetic structure, detected in four species. Regional structuring (i.e. division of sites into genetically and spatially distinct regions) was most common, detected in 20 species and nearly in all endemics and habitat specialists. Seven species displayed chaotic (spatially unordered) structuring, and all were nonendemic generalist species. Chaotic structure also associated with relatively high global FST. Pelagic larval duration (PLD) was not a strong predictor of variation in population structure (R2=0.22), but accounting for higher FST values of chaotic and invertebrate species, compared to regionally structured and fish species, doubled the power of PLD to explain variation in global FST (adjusted R2=0.50). Multivariate correlation of eight species traits to six genetic traits highlighted dispersal ability, taxonomy (i.e. fish vs. invertebrate) and habitat specialization as strongest influences on genetics, but otherwise left much variation in genetic traits unexplained. Considering that the study design controlled for many sampling and geographical factors, the extreme interspecific variation in spatial genetic patterns observed for Hawaii marine species may be generated by demographic variability due to species-specific abundance and migration patterns and/or seascape and historical factors.

AB - What shapes variation in genetic structure within a community of codistributed species is a central but difficult question for the field of population genetics. With a focus on the isolated coral reef ecosystem of the Hawaiian Archipelago, we assessed how life history traits influence population genetic structure for 35 reef animals. Despite the archipelago's stepping stone configuration, isolation by distance was the least common type of genetic structure, detected in four species. Regional structuring (i.e. division of sites into genetically and spatially distinct regions) was most common, detected in 20 species and nearly in all endemics and habitat specialists. Seven species displayed chaotic (spatially unordered) structuring, and all were nonendemic generalist species. Chaotic structure also associated with relatively high global FST. Pelagic larval duration (PLD) was not a strong predictor of variation in population structure (R2=0.22), but accounting for higher FST values of chaotic and invertebrate species, compared to regionally structured and fish species, doubled the power of PLD to explain variation in global FST (adjusted R2=0.50). Multivariate correlation of eight species traits to six genetic traits highlighted dispersal ability, taxonomy (i.e. fish vs. invertebrate) and habitat specialization as strongest influences on genetics, but otherwise left much variation in genetic traits unexplained. Considering that the study design controlled for many sampling and geographical factors, the extreme interspecific variation in spatial genetic patterns observed for Hawaii marine species may be generated by demographic variability due to species-specific abundance and migration patterns and/or seascape and historical factors.

KW - Chaotic genetic heterogeneity

KW - Community genetics

KW - Hawaii

KW - Marine connectivity

KW - Pelargic larval duration

KW - Stepping stone dispersal

U2 - 10.1111/mec.12804

DO - 10.1111/mec.12804

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 3064

EP - 3079

JO - Molecular Ecology

T2 - Molecular Ecology

JF - Molecular Ecology

SN - 0962-1083

IS - 12

ER -

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ID: 129141456