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Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

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Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata). / Holland, Nicholas D.; Somorjai, Ildiko M. L.

In: Acta Zoologica, 07.01.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Holland, ND & Somorjai, IML 2021, 'Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata)', Acta Zoologica. https://doi.org/10.1111/azo.12371

APA

Holland, N. D., & Somorjai, I. M. L. (2021). Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata). Acta Zoologica. https://doi.org/10.1111/azo.12371

Vancouver

Holland ND, Somorjai IML. Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata). Acta Zoologica. 2021 Jan 7. https://doi.org/10.1111/azo.12371

Author

Holland, Nicholas D. ; Somorjai, Ildiko M. L. / Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata). In: Acta Zoologica. 2021.

Bibtex - Download

@article{507a99c8e4084ce6969df41755cd8bd5,
title = "Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata)",
abstract = "Abstract The epidermis of a cephalochordate is described by scanning electron microscopy before tail amputation and at the following intervals thereafter: 1 day, 3 days, 6 days, 10 days and 14 days. Before amputation, the epidermis covering the entire body, including the tail, was a monolayer of non-ciliated cells in a hexagonal array. In one-day amputees, epidermal cells from the wound edge migrated, evidently by means of contractile lobopodia, forming a loosely associated monolayer on the cut surface. In the three-day amputee, cells covering the regenerate had resumed their tight-packed hexagonal array; however, in the six- and ten-day samples, the cells covering the regenerating tail were loosely associated again and smaller than before. Surprisingly, in the same six- and ten-day samples, the epidermal cells covering all body regions anterior to the regenerate had changed conspicuously?their apical cell membranes had shrunk, thereby opening up an intercellular gap, although the cells maintained their hexagonal shape and appeared to have the same neighbours as before. This gapped stage (of unknown significance) lasted about a week, after which the gaps closed up, and all the epidermal cells, including those on the regenerating tail, resumed their close association with their neighbours in a hexagonal grid.",
keywords = "Amphioxus, Cell migration, Cephalochordata, Epidermis, Lobopodia",
author = "Holland, {Nicholas D.} and Somorjai, {Ildiko M. L.}",
note = "Cephalochordate research in the Somorjai laboratory is funded by Welcome Trust ISSF3 and EU Horizon 2020 grants INFRADEV4 [654248]; cephalochordate work in the Holland laboratory is supported by NSF Grant IOS 1952567.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1111/azo.12371",
language = "English",
journal = "Acta Zoologica",
issn = "0001-7272",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epidermal changes during tail regeneration in the Bahamas lancelet, Asymmetron lucayanum (Cephalochordata)

AU - Holland, Nicholas D.

AU - Somorjai, Ildiko M. L.

N1 - Cephalochordate research in the Somorjai laboratory is funded by Welcome Trust ISSF3 and EU Horizon 2020 grants INFRADEV4 [654248]; cephalochordate work in the Holland laboratory is supported by NSF Grant IOS 1952567.

PY - 2021/1/7

Y1 - 2021/1/7

N2 - Abstract The epidermis of a cephalochordate is described by scanning electron microscopy before tail amputation and at the following intervals thereafter: 1 day, 3 days, 6 days, 10 days and 14 days. Before amputation, the epidermis covering the entire body, including the tail, was a monolayer of non-ciliated cells in a hexagonal array. In one-day amputees, epidermal cells from the wound edge migrated, evidently by means of contractile lobopodia, forming a loosely associated monolayer on the cut surface. In the three-day amputee, cells covering the regenerate had resumed their tight-packed hexagonal array; however, in the six- and ten-day samples, the cells covering the regenerating tail were loosely associated again and smaller than before. Surprisingly, in the same six- and ten-day samples, the epidermal cells covering all body regions anterior to the regenerate had changed conspicuously?their apical cell membranes had shrunk, thereby opening up an intercellular gap, although the cells maintained their hexagonal shape and appeared to have the same neighbours as before. This gapped stage (of unknown significance) lasted about a week, after which the gaps closed up, and all the epidermal cells, including those on the regenerating tail, resumed their close association with their neighbours in a hexagonal grid.

AB - Abstract The epidermis of a cephalochordate is described by scanning electron microscopy before tail amputation and at the following intervals thereafter: 1 day, 3 days, 6 days, 10 days and 14 days. Before amputation, the epidermis covering the entire body, including the tail, was a monolayer of non-ciliated cells in a hexagonal array. In one-day amputees, epidermal cells from the wound edge migrated, evidently by means of contractile lobopodia, forming a loosely associated monolayer on the cut surface. In the three-day amputee, cells covering the regenerate had resumed their tight-packed hexagonal array; however, in the six- and ten-day samples, the cells covering the regenerating tail were loosely associated again and smaller than before. Surprisingly, in the same six- and ten-day samples, the epidermal cells covering all body regions anterior to the regenerate had changed conspicuously?their apical cell membranes had shrunk, thereby opening up an intercellular gap, although the cells maintained their hexagonal shape and appeared to have the same neighbours as before. This gapped stage (of unknown significance) lasted about a week, after which the gaps closed up, and all the epidermal cells, including those on the regenerating tail, resumed their close association with their neighbours in a hexagonal grid.

KW - Amphioxus

KW - Cell migration

KW - Cephalochordata

KW - Epidermis

KW - Lobopodia

U2 - 10.1111/azo.12371

DO - 10.1111/azo.12371

M3 - Article

JO - Acta Zoologica

JF - Acta Zoologica

SN - 0001-7272

ER -

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